Fujifilm Film Simulation Challenge Roll 10 : Kodak Ektachrome 100SW

For the tenth instalment of the Film Simulation Challenge, I chose Ritchie’s Kodak Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe. The goal of the challenge is to use the same settings for 24 or 36 exposures, similar to shooting a roll of film. This particular film simulation recipe is intended to imitate the look of Kodak Ektachrome 100SW film. I “loaded” this “film” into my Fujifilm X-T2.

The bright and warm weather on this early evening dinner at the Brick Farm Tavern provided me with the opportunity to test out this film simulation recipe. The weather was just right for Brick Farm Tavern to open their outdoor seating for reservations. They had announced it last week, and I booked us for a table right away. They offered twenty-four socially distanced outdoor tables, of which sixteen of them can be reserved via OpenTable starting today! The rest of the tables are available for walk-ins on a first-come-first-served basis.

Kodak Ektachrome 100SW is another film which I have never used and since the film is discontinued, I will never get to use. Kodak discontinued Ektachrome 100 in 2002, ceased all production of Ektachrome films in 2012, but then brought it back in 2018 with a newer formulation. I have a 36 exposure roll of Ektachrome E100 that I will soon get to try in my Pentax ESII. Here’s Ritchie’s overview of Kodak Ektachrome 100SW Film:

Ektachrome was a line of color transparency (slide) films made by Kodak that used the E-6 development process. Some people preferred it to Kodachrome because of the faster ISO (100 vs 64 or 25), more saturated colors and easier development (although Kodachrome had finer grain, a larger dynamic range and didn’t fade as easily). A lot of National Geographic photographs were shot on Ektachrome back in the day.

There were a number of varieties of Ektachrome produced over the years, and I’ve used five of them myself. My favorite was Ektachrome 100VS (VS = “very saturated”), which was Kodak’s attempt at Fujifilm Velvia. Occasionally I used Ektachrome 100SW (SW = “saturated warm”), which was introduced in 1996 and produced vivid photographs with a warm color balance. Kodak stopped production of Ektachrome 100SW in 2002 and all Ektachrome film in 2012.

The images have a slightly green cast to them but I think that added to the feeling of “summer” al fresco dining.

Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
Tuesday 16 June, 2020 | Day 86 | FujiFilm X-T2 | XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR

Submitted as part of the 100DaysToOffload project.

human being | casual photographer | nemophilist | philomath | human being khakis | t-shirt | flip-flops

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