Sunday Paper, Rucksack, Magazine, Camera, Pocket Watch, Notebook, Leather, Range Finder Camera, Camera, Ruck

Jim Grey on how he can write a new blog post almost every day.

I write about whatever I want — it’s a personal blog after all. Anything is subject fodder. I write about photography and cameras a lot because it’s a lifelong interest and I’ve found my largest, most engaged audience there. Yes, I pander shamelessly to you film photographers!Jim Grey

Some people just want all the profit for themselves.

Lab engineered coffee means nothing good for the environment or humanity, least of all for the farmers upon whose livelihood the coffee trade depends. It means only more money for western tech dorks with Mike Judge Silicon Valley sounding start-up names, and less delicious product in the cup.“Molecular” Coffee Just Got A $2.6M Investment From The Impossible Burger

I commuted less into Lower Manhattan this summer, and I’m fortunate I had that option.

Last year was dubbed the “summer of hell” for NJ Transit riders due to track work in Penn Station New York.

But riders say the commute last year was almost heavenly, compared to the almost daily purgatory of canceled trains and severe overcrowding that has plagued NJ Transit this summer.Larry Higgs at nj.com

For employers, it’s challenging to find qualified information security professionals, mostly because those same employers are not willing to train the next generation. Most experience professionals, including myself, have worked in the field for decades and have had to fund our training.

According to the study, 42% of respondents planning to see out their careers in cybersecurity have a bachelor’s degree and 33% a master’s degree.Most Cyber Workers Plan to See Out Their Careers in the Field

The “Fish Tube” is cooler than Elon Musk’s Hyperloop.

In a video that went viral over the weekend, a man in a bright-yellow rubber suit, standing chest-deep in the Columbia River, in Washington State, grabs a hefty salmon from the water and loads the fish into a chute. The fish suddenly shoots upward, through a rubbery, translucent sleeve—the “fish tube,” as the Internet decided to call it, which is a contraption that evokes a rollercoaster and a luge, if those things were constructed out of a slippery, rubbery material, kind of like the silicon used to make nonstick cookware. You see the fish’s silhouette wagging along against a desert-mountain backdrop, as if it were still swimming—but now it’s in the sky, over the dam, barrelling back down, and then splash, back into the water. The narrative arc, in one minute flat.The Nihilistic Euphoria of the Fish Tube

Is your glass half-empty or half-full?

Things aren’t mutually exclusive, awesome or awful. Mostly they’re both, and if we poke around our thoughts and feelings, we can see multiple angles. To Hamlet, Denmark was a dungeon. But the real prison was his thinking, as he admitted.

Neutrality sets us free. It helps us see something more like the truth, what’s happening, instead of experiencing circumstances in relation to expectations and desires. This provides clarity and eliminates obstacles, making things neither awesome nor awful but cool.

It can even lead to illumination. In fact, abandoning duality is the way to enlightenment in the Taoist and Zen Buddhist traditions. Truth has no this or that. The path has no ordinary or holy, said Zen master Fu-Jung 1,000 years ago.Stop Being Positive and Just Cultivate Neutrality For Existential Cool

Why Deepfake Audio Technology Is a Real Threat to Enterprise Security (Security Intelligence)

According to Axios, deepfake audio technology has already begun wreaking havoc on the business world, as threat actors use the tech to impersonate CEOs. Symantec has reported three successful audio attacks on private companies that involved a call from the “CEO” to a senior financial officer requesting an urgent money transfer. Just imagine how an incident like this would affect your company.

Time to start thinking about mitigation.

The Browser Monopoly by Blair Reeves (Blair Reeves)

There is really only one Big Tech monopoly that I actively worry about. It’s not Amazon, Facebook or Apple, though they are all extremely dominant in their respective fields and do act in anti-competitive ways that merit regulatory remedy. Rather, the tech monopoly that I wonder about is arguably one of the more mundane parts of the modern internet experience: your web browser, and its most likely source – Google.

Zeldman warned us about this last year.