It's Time for Action on Privacy, Says Apple's CEO Tim Cook by Tim Cook (Time)
One of the biggest challenges in protecting privacy is that many of the violations are invisible. For example, you might have bought a product from an online retailer—something most of us have done. But what the retailer doesn’t tell you is that it then turned around and sold or transferred information about your purchase to a “data broker”—a company that exists purely to collect your information, package it and sell it to yet another buyer.

The trail disappears before you even know there is a trail. Right now, all of these secondary markets for your information exist in a shadow economy that’s largely unchecked—out of sight of consumers, regulators and lawmakers.

Let’s be clear: you never signed up for that. We think every user should have the chance to say, “Wait a minute. That’s my information that you’re selling, and I didn’t consent.”
Image from flickr.

Woot! Best thing I’ve read all month! I fully support this. The EU GDPR document was a not a riveting read but is a punch to the groin for data aggregators and brokers. And it put in place fines, 4% of revenue, for violations. We need similar legislation here.

Getting the bundle identifier of an OS X application in a shell script (Super User)

How about reading the bundle identifier from the application's Info.plist file directly using PlistBuddy (8):

/usr/libexec/PlistBuddy -c 'Print CFBundleIdentifier' /Applications/Safari.app/Contents/Info.plist

I needed to obtain the bundle identifier to setup QuickCursor. This did the trick.

Getting the iPad to Pro by Craig Mod (Craig Mod)

I’ve used iPads for eight years. Ever since the incredibly clunky — but oddly enthralling — version one.1 Mostly, it’s been confusing. Just what the heck are these things for? They’re definitely excellent for hypnotizing small children at restaurants. But since 2017, with the release of iOS 11 and basic multitasking, you could maybe — just maybe — earnestly use them as potential laptop replacements.

These new iPads may be gorgeous pieces of kit, but the iPad Pros of 2017 were also beautiful machines — svelte and overpowered. In fact, the iPad Pro hardware, engineering, and silicon teams are probably the most impressive units at Apple of recent years. The problem is, almost none of the usability or productivity issues with iPads are hardware issues.

Which is to say: For years now, the iPad’s shortcomings are all in iOS.

On a gut level, today’s iPad hardware feels about two or three years ahead of its software. Which is unfortunate, but not unfixable.

I was particularly interested in Craig’s experience as a photographer using the iPad Pro. My experiences and frustrations have been similar to Craig’s. Craig goes on to document his experiences trying to complete certain tasks (editing a spreadsheet, multiple documents etc.) on the iPad Pro. Please read it.