Foodie is an app for foodies to take photos of food

Foodie is a camera app designed to help users take better photos of food. The app is quite simple to use. After launching the app, the user chooses a filter -- there are 24 from which to choose -- and snaps an image. Each filter is designed for a particular food type; e.g. YOU for breakfast items like egg and RO for alcoholic beverages. That's how I have interpreted the hard to see icons.

The Foodie camera has an auto-blurring function that blurs the background to focus the food item's image. The app automatically recognizes food as the subject and defocuses the surrounding area to simulate a large aperture lens's narrow depth of field. Most high-end restaurants tend to be high on ambience, which in many cases means low on light. The Foodie app can control the iPhone's flash using it to provide continuous lighting.

The user can also import existing images from the iPhone photo library.

bacon and toast on plate
Sunday 21 February, 2016 | Apple iPhone 6 | iPhone 6 back camera 4.15mm f/2.2

A lot of people like to shoot food images from directly above. Foodie has a feature that changes the shutter button from black to yellow when the iPhone is horizontal to aid the shooter in getting the perfect shot. The app automatically saves captured images to the iPhone Photos app and shares to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

  • App name: Foodie
  • Supported devices: Android, iPhone
  • Cost: Free
  • Developer and operator: LINE Corporation
growler of beer, cake, pint of ale
Sunday 21 February, 2016 | Apple iPhone 6 | iPhone 6 back camera 4.15mm f/2.2

RNI Films

I started on my photography journey with film back in college when I took a winter course. I spent a lot of time trying to capture artistic images of the architecture of the Drew University campus using Kodak Ektachrome film on my Pentax P3.

While I didn't enjoy the smell of the darkroom chemicals, I sometimes miss the film look. For over a year, I've used VSCOcam film simulation filters on my iPhone, and more recently VSCO Lightroom high-end film simulation presets to create that nostalgic look of the film in my iPhone images. I bought almost every VSCOcam preset available but have only used a few.

Import an image
Import an image

But recently I've discovered another app, the Really Nice Images (RNI) Films high-end film simulation filters app for iOS. The app does a great job of making my iPhone images have the look of Kodak and Fuji films from the 70s and the 80s. But the app has a downside.

Import, crop and align image
Import, crop and align image

Just like VSCOcam, RNI Films is free to download from the App Store. The app comes with a free set of presets for negative, slide, black and white, and instant films. Additional presets can be purchased for $2.99. My favourite presets are Fuji Velvia 100F, and Kodak E 100G slide film presets. They produce saturated images for landscapes.

Apply Film Preset
Apply Film Preset

RNI Films also has a reasonably decent set of image editing tools. I like using the fade tool to add a matte print effect to my images.

Edit the Image
Edit the Image

Sharing to social media is limited to Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. RNI Films doesn't have a way to export to the iOS share sheet.

Export to social media
Export to social media

One downside of the app is the lack of a camera or in-app library and the ability to be called from the edit-in menu from the iOS Photos app. This makes for an awkward workflow. Currently, I do use the native iOS camera app to snap a photo, then launch RNI Film and find and load the image from Photos, apply a filter, make edits and then export back to the camera roll. It's unproductive.

My workflow involves snapping a few images then later, scrolling through the iOS camera roll, and tagging my favourites or moving the pictures I want to work on into a folder. I would typically import these images into VSCO Cam's library for editing. From there, I can edit/tweak a picture and then copy/paste the changes I made to each image in the library. Efficient.

Another thing that bothered me is the inability to organize the presets. There are a few preset that I will use often. I would like to put my most frequently used film types at the beginning of the list. Currently, I find my self scrolling through almost to the end of access the Fuji Velvia and Kodak E100 film types. That's frustrating.

I just want non-destructive editing of TIFF and JPG images that are accessible from the favourite folder. This has been available in iOS since version 8 and the lack of this feature means keeping my original image and a copy of the edited image.

The app is at version 1.0, so I hope that the RNI Films will address these deficiencies in the next release. Until them, I'm having a blast pretending that I'm shooting Kodak film on my Pentax P3.

Original Image
Original Image
Fuji Provia 100F
Fuji Provia 100F
Fuji Velvia 100F
Fuji Velvia 100F
Kodak E100 G
Kodak E100 G