Yellow Warbler

Ray and I chanced upon a moment of magic as we wandered through Stokes State Forest Park trails near Sandyston. Nestled among the white blossoms of a cherry blossom tree, a Yellow Warbler gazed out at the world, its feathers a bright, cheerful yellow trimmed with delicate, reddish streaks. The freshness of spring was all around, the air sweet with the scent of blooms.

The warbler seemed as curious about me as I was about it. It perched perfectly still, perhaps enjoying the gentle warmth of the spring sun just like I was. I felt connected to this tiny bird, a shared participant in the season's drama.

I admired how this small and delicate songbird brought life to the already vibrant sound of nature's morning symphony. Here in the lush green of Stokes State Forest Park, the simplicity of a bird amongst the blossoms is so easily missed if one doesn't stop to look.

We found three individuals making noise and chasing each other among the tree's branches, leaves, and blossoms. The Yellow Warbler was not on my shotlist, but the birds were so entertaining that Ray and I couldn't pass up the opportunity. The challenge was, "How do I get a clear photograph of these rapidly moving birds?".

We had fun trying. The birds hopped among the branches and stem, sometimes zooming away to another tree on the far end of the pond.

American Redstart

The American Redstart is coal-black with vivid orange patches on the sides, wings, and tail, but I prefer the orange "scarf" of the Blackburnian Warbler.

I have one good photograph of the American Redstart, and this is it. This little warbler hops among tree branches moving quickly and erratically. I did my best to keep up, but I had just a couple of keepers when I reviewed the images in Adobe Lightroom. This image is the best of the two.

The American Redstart is coal-black with vivid orange patches on the sides, wings, and tail, but I prefer the orange "scarf" of the Blackburnian Warbler.

Cerulean Warbler

A different view of the Cerulean Warbler.

A different view of the Cerulean Warbler. The leaves obscure the wings of this individual, but this setting feels more natural and pleasing to me. The green contrasts nicely with the blue feathers.