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Bad news: there's no solution to false information online by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller

It's clearly impossible for the web as a platform to objectively report that a stated fact is true or false. This would require a central authority of truth - let's call it MiniTrue for short. It may, however, be possible for our browsers and social platforms to show us the conversation around an article or component fact. Currently, links on the web are contextless: if I link to the Mozilla Information Trust Initiative, there's no definitive way for browsers, search engines or social platforms to know whether I agree or disagree with what is said within (for the record, I'm very much in agreement - but a software application would need some non-deterministic fuzzy NLP AI magic to work that out from this text).

Imagine, instead, if I could highlight a stated fact I disagree with in an article, and annotate it by linking that exact segment from my website, from a post on a social network, from an annotations platform, or from a dedicated rating site like Tribeworthy. As a first step, it could be enough to link to the page as a whole. Browsers could then find backlinks to that segment or page and help me understand the conversation around it from everywhere on the web. There's no censoring body, and decentralized technologies work well enough today that we wouldn't need to trust any single company to host all of these backlinks. Each browser could then use its own algorithms to figure out which backlinks to display and how best to make sense of the information, making space for them to find a competitive advantage around providing context.

There is a lot to think about.

36th Annual QuickChek Festival of Ballooning pre-festival Media Launch

Photos from the 36th Annual QuickChek Festival of Ballooning pre-festival Media Launch

I attended the QuickChek Festival of Ballooning pre-festival Media Launch event yesterday with a bunch of photographers from the Somerset County Meetup. I arrived around 6:30 AM but due to work commitments, I was only able to shoot for about 45 minutes. I have attended a few of these in the past. I was unprepared for this as my new camera has not yet arrived. I shot the event with a borrowed camera and Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 USM IS-LM lens. It was a bit too "zoomy" for this event but ... I made it work.

What sort of photographer shows up at a balloon festival with a 70-200mm lens?

Thirteen images stitched in Adobe Photoshop using the panorama feature.

Bhavna and I are planning a fall balloon adventure over the Letchworth State Park in upstate New York. We've never done this before, but the idea of being up in the air and being swept wherever the wind may take us, seems exciting.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 102mm | f/8.0 | ISO 160
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/8.0 | ISO 400
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 88mm | f/8.0 | ISO 160
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 135mm | f/2.8 | ISO 100
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 200mm | f/8.0 | ISO 2000
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/4.0 | ISO 100
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 200mm | f/4.0 | ISO 200
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/4.0 | ISO 100
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/8.0 | ISO 250
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 185mm | f/8.0 | ISO 320
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/8.0 | ISO 125
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/8.0 | ISO 100
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 200mm | f/8.0 | ISO 125
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 200mm | f/8.0 | ISO 200
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 200mm | f/8.0 | ISO 125
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM @ 70mm | f/8.0 | ISO 100