The Original iPad mini and Apple’s fluid vision by Nitin Khanna (Nitin Khanna)
It seems like Steve Jobs and Apple understood that you can’t place things too close inside the screen, but forgot that you can’t place the screen and the edge too close either, because it’ll cause hours of headaches by unwanted swipes, taps, and hard pressed. The Apple of today thinks bezels are bad and it is wrong. Steve Jobs might have said the above, but he’s also the one constantly touting that they made their devices thinner, which reduces battery life and also the ‘holdability’ of mobile devices.
I think the only thing that has changed at Apple is that Steve Jobs died. But that is the most significant change. While I am sure there are employees at Apple who have said, ”We think the bezels are too narrows” or ”This device is too thin and slippery”, their voices don’t have the same weight as Steve Jobs saying, ” That’s stupid!”.

And that makes all the difference. Steve was a user, just like you and me. He mostly like used Apple’s product often and probably found and had engineers fix I think the only thing that has changed at Apple is that Steve Jobs died. But that is the most significant change. While I am sure there are employees at Apple who have said, ”We think the bezels are too narrows” or ”This device is too thin and slippery”, their voices don’t have the same weight as Steve Jobs saying, ” That’s stupid!”.

And that makes all the difference. Steve was a user, just like you and me. He most likely used Apple’s product often and found all the issues that annoyed him and probably told his people to fix them. He’s not there anymore to inform Jony, and Phil, and Tim when they are being stupid.

That’s been one of my mantras – focus and simplicity.Steve Jobs

The war on ports, the fanaticism over thinness and big screen size will eventually fade. Hopefully soon. My iPhone 7 fits just on the edge of comfort inside my dress pant and is painful in the front pockets of my jeans. The iPhone XR is even bigger. I put a case on my iPhone 7 because the shiny package was sliding out of my hand.

2018 is the first year since 2010 that I have not upgraded my iPad and iPhone to the latest.

The war on ports, the fanaticism over thinness and screen size is hopefully over.

iPhone Battery Replacement Failure

Yesterday, I received the following email from a friend (and former Sarnoff colleague).

Went to Apple to get a new battery under the battery warranty program. ($29)

(My old battery had been recharged over 700 times, however, was still showing effectiveness of 93%. This surprised me… I thought it wasn’t holding that well. I nonetheless decided to do battery replacement…)

However…
Apple killed home button on iPhone in process of battery R&R! [argh!]

So…
Apple gave me a brand new iPhone, a matching SE (with upgraded version of the ?P).

However…
Had to do encrypted restore (had done BU this morning); entire process took 3 hours. [sigh]

Have you backed up your iPhone, with the encrypted backup version?

PS: Apple tech said I was 1st person he had ever dealt with who knew iOS and encrypted passwords needed.

Ugh! This is the second person I know personally to report an adverse event for battery replacement with Apple support. I had planned on doing the same for my iPhone 7 but now I am hesitant. The battery in my iPhone 7 is at 81% for effective health. I recently replaced the screen ($129) after dropping the device face down onto a Princeton sidewalk (the new parking meters support payment by smartphone). I am also considering replacing the battery in my wife’s 2013 11″ MacBook Air. We want to extend the useful life of the device to reduce our expenses. We just bought a 2018 MacBook Air for our daughter.

I back up to iCloud (automatic while the device is on Wi-Fi and charging overnight). According to Apple, iCloud backups are always encrypted.

Do you back up to iTunes as well as iCloud? Is it an encrypted backup? What are the pros and cons of iTunes over iCloud for backup?