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Reconsidering Choices: Reflecting on the Lectric XPremium Electric Bike Experience

There are definitely some positives and negatives to the Lectric XPremium e-bike. Lately, though, the downsides are starting to outweigh the benefits.

I love my Lectric XPremium electric bike for several reasons.

First and foremost, the mid-drive motor is fantastic. The motor is positioned in the middle of the bike, near the bottom bracket or the pedal area. It provides powerful and efficient performance, making my rides smooth and enjoyable. The torque sensor adds to this experience by ensuring the motor accurately responds to my pedalling, giving me the right assistance when needed. I seldom used the throttle, opting to pedal and enjoy the physical activity. I deactivated the throttle after a few months.

I also appreciate the step-through frame, which adds to the bike's accessibility and ease of use. It makes mounting and dismounting the bike effortless. I frequently have difficulties dismounting when riding a "standard bar" bicycle. I often hit the bar, lose my balance, and fall over. I think maybe it’s my age.

The hydraulic disc brakes are a standout feature as well. They provide exceptional stopping power and precise control, giving me peace of mind during my rides, especially when dealing with challenging terrains or unexpected obstacles (like pedestrians in the bike lanes).

The long battery life of the Lectric XPremium is truly impressive. It allows me to go on two-hour bicycle tours without "range anxiety". I can explore new areas, go on longer adventures, and enjoy the ride without worrying about running out of battery power.

Until now, I have completed two round trips of approximately 33 kilometres each from my residence, travelling along the Delaware and Raritan Canal Park Trail using the XPremium bike. The first ride was to a local brewery, and the second one was simply for the joy of it. Following each of these rides, the XPremium displayed that the battery still had approximately 75% charge.

Lastly, I must mention the solid construction of the bike. The XPremium feels like a tank. It feels durable and well-built, giving me confidence in its longevity and performance, which is important when buying a high-quality electric bike.

Overall, the Lectric XPremium has exceeded my expectations with its mid-drive motor, torque sensor, foldable design, step-through frame, hydraulic disc brakes, long battery life, and solid construction. It's a fantastic electric bike that provides an exceptional riding experience.

Bicycle Ride, Delaware & Raritan Canal Park Trail, e-Bike, Griggstown
Griggstown · Sunday 14 May 2023 · FujiFilm X-T3 · XF27mmF2.8 R WR

Butt there are a few things about it that I dislike. First of all, the cable wrap has been a nightmare. I had a damaged rear speed sensor that needed to be replaced, but the mess of cable ties and cable wrap surrounding the cables has made the repair process incredibly difficult. It's frustrating that I might have to pay someone else to repair this.

The foldable design of the bike is another great feature that would make transportation and storage incredibly convenient. But even without batteries, it doesn't fit into my wife's 2013 Acura RDX. Following the tips in this , I removed both batteries, folded the e-bike, and lifted it (oh, my poor back) into the trunk. No matter how I positioned the e-bike, I could not close the trunk.

: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbLrPqCb7L8&t=16s

Another major issue is the weight of the bike. It weighs 34kg, and even with the batteries (6kg) removed, lifting and moving it around is a real challenge. Despite its folding feature, it's still quite heavy to lift into the back of the Acura RDX, making transportation a hassle. This means that my riding adventures are limited to my local area.

This limits my ability to explore trails in other towns, go on adventures in another state, and enjoy rides outside my immediate area. When Bhavna and I visited Matt and Jean in Lewes last summer, I discovered that Cape Henlopen State Park was a haven for birds and other wildlife. There are a lot of biking trails. I imagined myself getting up early and spending the morning riding on those trails and stopping to photograph the birds and other wildlife. But that goal now seems impossible.

We had a great weekend when Bhavna and I visited Matt and Jean in Lewes last summer. I was so excited to learn that Cape Henlopen State Park was a refuge for birds and wildlife. The park has these extensive biking trails too. I had this whole plan in my head of waking up early, hopping on my bike, and cruising on a bicycle along those trails while taking photos of the birds and wildlife. I didn't have the right bicycle or Fujinon lens (the XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR) back then. But now, I finally have the perfect bicycle and lens I need. But now that dream doesn't seem possible anymore.

Furthermore, the suspension on the bike leaves much to be desired. I had a small camera bag in the rear basket, and the poor suspension caused it to bounce out during a ride. Unfortunately, I had left the bag slightly open, and the Fuji X-T3 camera body bounced onto the gravelled trail. It’s frustrating to have such a basic issue with a feature that should be reliable. Fortunately, neither the camera body nor the lens were damaged. They escaped with a few scratches.

Given all these problems, I may have been better off purchasing another bicycle.

Author: Khürt Williams

A human who works in information security and enjoys photography, Formula 1 and craft ale.

8 thoughts on “Reconsidering Choices: Reflecting on the Lectric XPremium Electric Bike Experience”

    1. @jeremycherfas it was a lesson learned for me. I want to pay more attention to the trail to see the problem sections. The camera is fine but no longer looks "like new".

  1. @khurtwilliams A few thoughts and questions about your bike. What's the terrain you're riding on? Is it pavement or trail? If both, what's the ratio? I ask because, regarding the bounciness you're experiencing you way be well served by lowering your tire pressure. What is it currently? My suggestion is run it as low as you can for maximum comfort. If you're on a mix of pavement and trail, try 20psi. If mostly trail, try 10 to 15. My fat tire bike pressure for trail and gravel roads is usually 8 to 10psi. Right now it's 5psi. But that's a non-powered bike that weighs 30lbs. For a heavier e-bike I'd keep it above 10. It will give you a much softer ride. The primary negative impact is that it will lower your range a bit. Experiment. If I recall those are rated for 35-55 miles. I was getting 35-40 with my 1st generation Lectric. If you're doing a 20 mile trip you would likely be fine with 15psi.

    Looking at the photo, your bag and the rear basket, my suggestion is getting a little net or a couple bungee cords. I always use something to strap in anything I'm carrying. And that basket looks pretty shallow. Strap it in and you'll never have to worry. I've ridden thousands of miles without incident.

    Regarding weight, yes, these are heavy bikes and the foldable aspect is difficult with all that weight. Mine is about 68 lbs. and they're not THAT small! And clumsy to maneuver. I think the ideal situation as that they be lifted into low spaces but kept upright. Not many cars will have the needed height, probably only taller hatchbacks. Most cars probably require tilting to the side making it even more difficult.

    All that said, how healthy are you? When I bought my first two e-bikes I did so assuming that my knee injury of any decades would be an ongoing issue. I thought I needed the e-assist. After 4 months of riding I'd grown confident that I was wrong and that I could ride without the e-assist. I took a chance and bought my fat bike. Best decision I could have made. If you're in good health I'd guess you'd have no problems with a 10 to 20 mile ride. I was a fairly healthy person and had no problems with 20 mile rides and within a few months was regularly doing 35 to 45 miles rides. The hardest part was seat comfort. Takes a bit of time to get used to longer rides.

    There are quite a few foldable bikes, non-powered, that are in the 25-35 lb range and will be much easier to tote around in a car!

    1. @Denny

      Thanks for all the tips!

      I typically ride the e-bike on residential streets and one-lane country/village roads to get to the Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park Trail, but most of the tour is on the trail. I do most of my biking on the right-hand side of the "V". It’s flat terrain. My longest round-trip ride on the trail has been about 33km.

      A few thoughts and questions about your bike. What's the terrain you're riding on? Is it pavement or trail? If both, what's the ratio?

      The trail is crushed stone over hard-packed dirt with asphalt in the sections where it crosses a road near a bridge. The trail was built along the towpath of the Delaware & Raritan Canal, built in the early 1830s as a transportation corridor between Philadelphia and New York. There are sections of the trail with cobblestone slips where the boats would enter/exit the canal. These are extremely uncomfortable on any bicycle. I usually get off and walk the bike.

      I ask because, regarding the bounciness you're experiencing you way be well served by lowering your tire pressure. What is it currently? My suggestion is run it as low as you can for maximum comfort. If you're on a mix of pavement and trail, try 20psi. If mostly trail, try 10 to 15.

      The XPremium is a fat tyre e-bike. I follow the Lectric e-Bikes recommendation of 20 PSI for both tyres. Lectric recommends inflating the tyres to a few PSI below their max for a more comfortable ride when doing street riding. When riding at lower pressures, over bumps, there is an increased risk of pinch flats.

      Looking at the photo, your bag and the rear basket, my suggestion is getting a little net or a couple bungee cords. I always use something to strap in anything I'm carrying. And that basket looks pretty shallow. Strap it in and you'll never have to worry. I've ridden thousands of miles without incident.

      After my incident, I bought a set of bungee cords. Lesson learned.

      All that said, how healthy are you? When I bought my first two e-bikes I did so assuming that my knee injury of any decades would be an ongoing issue. I thought I needed the e-assist. After 4 months of riding I'd grown confident that I was wrong and that I could ride without the e-assist.

      I’m fairly sedentary, but I know this. I haven’t tried using the "standard" bicycle, but I may try. In the past, I didn’t get more than a few miles without pain.

      The e-Bike is a joy to ride in the spring and fall, but summer temperatures (> 32ºC) and humidity (> 70%) make riding very dangerous. With the smoke from the Canadian forest fires, I had not ridden for the last two months. My weight is about 71kg at 1.63 m in height.

      There are quite a few foldable bikes, non-powered, that are in the 25-35 lb range and will be much easier to tote around in a car!

      I’ll consider that at a later date. The XPremium is a recent purchase.

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