Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

In late May, I started using Merlin ID to identity photograph the birds in my backyard and the nearby woods.

Now that I have the Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R OIS LM WR, I use it at every opportunity. In late May, I used the Merlin Bird ID app to identify and photograph Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) in the wooded area behind my backyard, just on the other side of the fence.

The variety of bird species that call those woods their home is fascinating. So far, I've managed to identify almost a dozen different types of birds there. Their melodious calls fill the early morning air, adding a delightful touch to the surroundings.

The Northern Cardinal stands out with its distinctiveness, elegant and vibrant red plumage. Cardinals choose not to migrate, allowing me to enjoy their beauty all year round. They are a delightful sight, especially in winter when they contrast against the snow-covered landscape.

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) · Wednesday 31 May 2023 · FujiFilm X-T3 at 180 sec · XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR at 600 mm

Unfortunately, a 74-acre property on the other side of the fence, owned by Trap Rock Industries, is planned for housing development. This proposed development sits between two fragile and protected wetlands, which serve as crucial feeding and watering habitats for migratory birds and other wildlife. These habitats are interconnected, with the wetlands separated by a narrow grassy corridor.

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) · Wednesday 31 May 2023 · FujiFilm X-T3 at 180 sec · XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR at 255.5mm

How will this affect the woods and wetlands? I’m not sure how much longer I can continue backyard bird photography.

Author: Khürt Williams

I work in application security architecture and I live in Montgomery Township, New Jersey with my wife Bhavna. I am passionate about photography. Expect to find writing on cybersecurity, tropical aquariums, terrariums, hiking, craft breweries, and bird photography.

23 thoughts on “Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)”

    1. @jl_siewert on glass.photo, a platform tailored for photographers like me, there are no "like" buttons. Instead, they have an '[Appreciate]' button, allowing users to privately show their admiration for photos and comments without visible public counts. I believe it's a positive feature that could also work well on micro.blog.

      It turns out the problem isn’t the like button, just what it powers. ~ glass.photo

      In art, sometimes words fail to express what we feel, but we instinctively know when we like something. A 'like' on my photo or post is a simple way of acknowledging that someone has seen my post and is saying, "Thank you for sharing." Similarly, liking someone's photo could be a friendly way of saying hello or showing appreciation for their work. Likes are comments.

      A like is a "wave". When I am out and about and see someone I know, I may not have time to stop and chat. So I wave. It’s my way of acknowledging them.

      People's reasons for liking a post can be as diverse as their taste in music. I find myself 'liking' posts that make me think, even if I don't entirely agree with the author's perspective. Other times, it's just a gesture of support for their creativity.

      We are complex creatures, and diverse emotions and intentions shape our interactions on social media. Adding an 'Appreciate' button on micro.blog could be a valuable way to enable users to express their admiration and support more nuancedly.

      It's important to note that social media has no "unlike" buttons.

  1. @parag, I searched the All Birds website. You may be confusing the scarlet tanager with the summer tanager. The Summer Tanagers’ range is not supposed to extend that far north.

    The Summer Tanager is a type of Cardinal and is found in the mixed deciduous-coniferous forests of New Jersey. That would be mostly at the southern end of the state in the Pinelands. Such a stunning colour.

    1. @Parag I searched the All Birds website. You may be confusing the scarlet tanager with the summer tanager. The Summer Tanagers’ range is not supposed to extend that far north.

      The Summer Tanager is a type of Cardinal and is found in the mixed deciduous-coniferous forests of New Jersey. That would be mostly at the southern end of the state in the Pinelands. Such a stunning colour.

  2. @khurtwilliams Just out of curiosity, do you crosspost to a separate, meaning not Mb, Mastodon or other social media service? That was my solution to most of your concerns about Mb.

    I'm really with you on lack of Open Graph previews. I know that hurts my crossposting "bridge solution," especially when sharing YouTube videos. But it works well for me for the most part.

    And like others have said, for what its worth, I really enjoy your posts (I follow you). I don't engage much because I'm super introverted and I think I have a different expectation from Mb vs. social media. Mb is one community a belong to and the home of the majority of my content. I know to have the sort of online life I want, I need to participate in multiple small, or at least not billionaire run, communities. I don't think any small single service, community, etc... can meet even my meager needs.

    1. @camacho I try my best to adhere to the IndieWeb principles of POSSE. I host my blog on WordPress because, unlike micro.blog, I control the platform. micro.blog is just another silo platform, after all.

      My WordPress posts were syndicated to Facebook (via Automattic’s JetPack) before they shuttered their API access. Automattic and micro.blog stopped supporting Twitter after Elon Musk raised prices. I still syndicate to micro.blog via the RSS feed, but the presentation is weak without Open Graph.

      WordPress has a built community via JetPack and WordPress Reader. WordPress Reader has been around since 2013 and is the WordPress equivalent of micro.blog’s chat feature. I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s what inspired Manton. Most of my comments and readership come via WordPress Reader.

      screenshot

      I was syndicating to Mastodon, but there is some problem with duplicates being created on my m.b. time when I do that, so I disabled it.

      I know to have the sort of online life I want, I need to participate in multiple small, or at least not billionaire run, communities. I don't think any small single service, community, etc... can meet even my meager needs.

      While I don't have a large following on Twitter (about 1500) or Instagram (around 500), I've been fortunate not to encounter the common issues that some people associate with these platforms.

      One of the reasons for my positive experience on large social platforms is that I already have genuine in-real-life connections with friends and family on those platforms.

      Forming deep connections with strangers solely through casual and trivial conversations on social media is challenging. While I value my interactions online, I think true belonging and understanding can only be found through genuine, in-person encounters.

      It's challenging for me to fully know someone beyond their avatar and screen name without the opportunity to meet face-to-face. I’ve never expected to make "friends" online.

      Maybe part of my frustration with m.b.is that I know what’s possible.

  3. @khurtwilliams Such a beautiful bird and so easy to observe. I'm still trying to learn the various cardinal songs. Another beautiful red bird I see often is the Summer Tanager and bonus, the female tanager is a very pretty yellow color!

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