Kodachrome 64 Memories

Early in my photography journey, shooting in 35mm B&W film was easier. I thought 35mm colour film was too distracting and did not have the pretension “art” look I was into at the time. But a few years later, I found myself experimenting with 35mm colour film including a lot of crap films. But I also tried out now famous 35mm films such as Kodachrome. I don't know if I ever exposed Kodachrome 25 or Kodachrome 200 but I found a set of slides of Kodachrome 64 among my things in the basement.

According to the B&H website which list this as Kodak KR 135-36 Kodachrome 64 Color Slide Film (ISO-64):

Kodachrome 64 is an extremely fine grain film demonstrating very high sharpness. It is an excellent choices for a wide variety of applications. The history and reputation of Kodachrome films is legendary. They possess a "look" that is hard to reproduce in more contemporary films.

Kodachrome 64 is a member of the "Select Series" of Kodak films. The Select Series offers serious snapshooters and photo enthusiasts the widest selection of high-performance films. Choose from Kodachrome or Kodak Elite Chrome films for slides, or Royal Gold films for prints.

The date on the box containing the slides is 26 July 1989. I scanned the slides with my Epson Perfection V600. Some of the exposure appears to be test shots take in the camera store. Looking at the images of the stores accross the street taken from inside the camera store, I see an address that apepars to be 7008 Third Avenue. I would love to find out what was at 7008 Third Avenye in New York City circa 1989. I do not remember why I chose to expose this roll at my cousin's wedding.

Type: 35mm color slide film
Speed: ISO 64
Applications: General photographic outdoor use
Process: Process K-14
Color Saturation: Produces rich, vibrant colors with a strong pallette
Grain: Fine
Sharpness: Very high
Exposure Latitude: Narrow

Cousins Tony and Colin Cozier | 26 July, 1989 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2
Beverly and Karen | 26 July, 1989 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2
David Jackson | 26 July, 1989 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2
Grand Dad Edmund Williams and Samantha Williams | 26 July, 1989 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2
Beverly | 26 July, 1989 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2
David Jackson and Roseanne Pompey | 26 July, 1989 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2

Erin's and Joe's Wedding

Building, People, Summer, Standing, Wedding
Aug 18, 2019, FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR
FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 16 mm, 0.002 sec at f/5.6, ISO 400, ©Khürt L. Williams, Aug 18, 2019
FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 16 mm, 0.002 sec at f/5.6, ISO 400, ©Khürt L. Williams, Aug 18, 2019
FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 16 mm, 0.010 sec at f/5.6, ISO 12800, ©Khürt L. Williams, Aug 18, 2019
FujiFilm X-T2 + 16-55 mm f/2.8 @ 38.8 mm, 0.013 sec at f/2.8, ISO 12800, ©Khürt L. Williams, Aug 18, 2019
FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ 16 mm, 0.008 sec at f/2.8, ISO 4000, ©Khürt L. Williams, Aug 18, 2019

Uday aur Bhairavi ki Shaadi

Bhavna's family is from Vadodara, Gujarat, India. These images are from her baby brother's Grah Shanti, Pithi, and Shaadi.

Hindu weddings are my favourite type of wedding. They are colourful and noisy affairs involving the entire family. A marriage in India (or Pakistan) is considered as a union between the two families and not just the couple. It includes many rituals which span over several days, although in Western countries this may be spread out over several weeks. In comparison, I think Western weddings are boring and stuffy affairs that can seem narcissistic (hello bridezilla) and lacking in colour. In any case, in Hinduism, it is considered inauspicious to wear black or white during marriage rituals.

Performed a day or two before the wedding ceremony, the Grah Shanti is a pre-wedding ritual where a religious ceremony, a pooja, is performed to invite Lord Ganesha into the home to remove all obstacles and bring happiness and prosperity to the couple. The groom's family performs the groom's Grah Shanti while the bride's family performs her Grah Shanti. These events are performed separately. The groom's family do not attend the bride's Grah Shanti and vice versa. It is done this way to get rid of individual negative energy or doshas that either of them may possess.

Uday's Grah Shanti was held at his paternal Uncle's (Jayesh Raval) home in Delran.

In Hinduism, it is considered very important that all the gods and goddesses attend the marriage ceremony to bless the groom. The ancestors and the forefathers of the bride and groom, living or not, are also invited. A learned priest, sometimes called Maharaj, performed the pooja. As Lord Ganesha is considered to be the remover of all the obstacles, he is invoked during this ceremony. The venue was adorned with icons, flowers, and other elaborate decorations. Close friends and family were invited to bless the groom.

I'm not sure, but I believe The Navagrah (9 planets) pooja was also done to worship the nine planets of the Vedic/Hindu Astrology. As it is believed that the stars and the planets have a significant influence on Hindu lives, this pooja is performed to ensure that the Navagrah or nine planets are aligned for both the bride and the groom to live a happy life together. As the name suggests, Grah means the house and Shanti means peace. Thus Grah Shanti means the peach of the house.

The groom, my brother-in-law Uday Raval | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
My sister-in-law Nilima and her husband, Mukesh | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
We're all staring at what Nilima is wearing on her head. | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Groom's parents, my in-laws Nirupama and Jagdish Raval | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 35 mm f/1.8
Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 35 mm f/1.8
Delran | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 35 mm f/1.8
Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 35 mm f/1.8

After the pooja, was the Pithi ceremony which for practicality was performed the same day as the Grah Shanti. The Pithi ceremony is traditionally performed the day before the wedding. It involves rubbing a paste made of chickpea flour, turmeric, or rose water on the groom. The family takes turns in putting some of it on. Once it’s applied correctly, the groom may be bathed in rose water.

Nandini's get in her uncles face. | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6
Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6

The Mehndi which is made using Henna, is a temporary tattoo that the bride, family, and friends put on their hands and some on their feet on special occasions but particularly at weddings. Kiran and Shaan both got this done.

Kiran's mehndi | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6
ladu | Thursday 24 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6

The second set of images are from the day of the Shaadi (wedding) itself. We all got dressed and spent some time in the hotel lobby taking family portraits of each other.

Khürt, Shaan, Kiran, Bhavna | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Nilima, Falguni, Bhavna and my mother-in-law, Nirupama | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Nilima, Falguni, Bhavna and my in-laws, Nirupama and Jagdish | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Joined by my nieces Nandini and Maya, and nephews Rohan and Rahul | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 35 mm f/1.8
We're all family - Sagar Raval, Dipan Patel (my wife's brother-in-law), Rahul, Jagdish Raval, Shaan, Me, Divyesh "Chaku" Raval, and Rohan | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 35 mm f/1.8

In the traditional Gujarati Shaadi, the groom goes to the bride’s house on a horse, while his relatives walk and dance along, often accompanied by a musical band. The groom’s family forms a procession to carry the groom to his bride for the formal wedding ceremony. The parade would include the use of the dhol, a type of drum, to loudly mark the arrival of the groom. Upon arrival at the bride's home, the groom's party consisting of immediate family, extended family, close family friends, etc. would call to the bride's family announcing that the groom has arrived to claim his bride. In modern times, the groom's party is typically accompanied by a DJ as well as the traditional dhol player. As is tradition, the brides remain out of sight.

Nilima talking to the horse? | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Uday arrives on a white horse | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8

Once the groom reaches the bride's house, he is welcomed by the bride’s mother with an aarti - the waving of a lighted lamp before the person to be honoured. In performing the rite, the bride's mother rotates the light three times in a clockwise direction while chanting a prayer or singing a hymn. After this, the wedding then takes place according to the Hindu traditions and customs of Gujurat.

Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Traditionally the bride and groom don't meet until the wedding day | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
The bride, Bhairavi "Toral" Desai, arrives | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Maya is bored | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Kiran and Maya | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
"Toral" and Uday | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
"Toral" and Uday | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
You must feed each other, says the mahraj | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Toral's mom says something funny | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
"Toral" and Uday | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
Jayesh Raval, Sameer Raval, Uday, Toral, Neha Raval, Jaimani Raval | Saturday 26 November, 2011 | Nikon D40 | AF-S Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8

After the ceremony, we danced away at the reception. That's when I put the camera away.