A Short Walk on the Stonebridge Trails

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Trail by jansenphotojansenphoto

Welcome to week 165 of the Tuesday Photo Challenge!
You certainly hit the Road with a passion! Not only were your posts creative, but there were a lot of them! This week, as I’m on the road for work, I went through some of images from Ireland and found a nice next step along our journey: Trail! Wh...

Yesterday I walked the Stonebrodge Trails with Bhavana. I've hiked or walked many of the trails in the area around Hopewell, Princeton, Hillsborough, and Montgomery including Van Horne Park Trail, Devil's Half Acre, Autumn Hill Reserve,Institute Woods Trails, D&R Canal Park Trail, Griggstown Native Grassland Preserve Trail, St. Michaels Farm Preserve, etc.. Most of the…

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2019-05-05 7:38

Good morning. Setting up for breakfast. Rain here today. I was in a dour mood. Then I saw this message from Craig Mod, a writer and photography who is walking thousands of kilometres across Japan. Day 21. A spectacular day, one of shops and people and food and trees and gentle breezes and merciful clouds.…

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people, rocks, sourland mountain

Charcoal

Charcoal

... in Japan, charcoal — real, serious, gorgeous, perfectly proportioned, cylindrical, rings-like-a-chime when you clank ‘em charcoal — is still very much a thing. Stop by one of the classic taiyaki shops in Azabu Jyuban or Kamakura and what are they cooking their anko filled pastries with? Charcoal. Why does excellent yakitori taste so good? Charcoal. When you hit up a grilled fish shop, where does that delicious bitter crisp on your kamasu or sawara or hokke come from? Charcoal. And when you’re at an inn in the countryside and they present you with a river fish impaled on a stick — when you shove it in the sand pit for cookin’ what’s sitting right below? Oh, yes, charcoal.

I enjoyed reading the “little note”,"End of an Era", with its short story of the men and the meat and the dancing girl and a link to an article Craig wrote about “real” charcoal, which reminded me of the smell of West Indies breadfruit roasting on “real” West Indies charcoal in my grandmother's “rustic” kitchen.…

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