In Search of a Shared National Narrative

In Search of a Shared National Narrative (Reason.com)

We've seen these factional clusters deepen, harden, and separate, leading in turn to anger, misunderstanding, and hostility. Meanwhile, trust in institutions—government, business, the media, and higher education—continues to erode. Cultural warfare further splits our society, exposing fundamental differences about our views of justice and human nature. Unable to agree on first principles, we cannot agree on what it means to be American. As a result, we share few of the touchstones that, in the past, contributed to our national mythology. For instance, talk of the Thanksgiving holiday or Puritans now spawns debate over genocide of Native Americans. Talk of the Founding Fathers spurs reminders of the slave system they protected. Even the national anthem causes division in sports. As we disregard or dismantle these symbols and pastimes, thereby altering our national narrative, can we replace them with stories and rites to unite our various groups and maintain meaning in our American experiment?

The USA. A nation which can't acknowledge and forgive itself for it's past. It descends into factionalism.

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Sunday Paper, Rucksack, Magazine, Camera, Pocket Watch, Notebook, Leather, Range Finder Camera, Camera, Ruck

Sunday Paper - Facebook, GDPR and Ireland, Racism, Brazilian Coffee, Mommy Blogging, Public Transportation and Princeton and the New York City Gateway Tunnel Project, New York City Commuter Tax

Unexceptional Racism by Drew Downs (Drew Downs)

At the root of American identity is an impossible paradox. A truth we wish could coexist so much, we would take up arms to defend it.

We want to be exceptional and equal at the same time. But we can’t. It’s impossible.

Sunday Paper is my personal collage of long-form articles, between 1,000 and 20,000 words, that I have saved during the weekend, that I found interesting and which I think require deep slow thinking. I think they are best read on a Sunday morning as a sort of personal Sunday newspaper. The pastor's writing is a…

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Lithium batteries banned from cargo holds on passenger flights in USA

US bans lithium batteries from cargo holds on passenger flights (TechCrunch)

While passengers won’t be required to change their behavior under the new ruleset, consumers may notice that batteries and charging devices shipped to them may arrive without a full charge.

This may also affect photographers travelling to workshops. I have four batteries for my Fuji X-T2. If I needed to bring along several lenses, a laptop, tripod, iPad Pro, iPhone battery pack, etc., I know this stuff would not fit in a carry-on bag.

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The security implications of China’s AI Strategy

Understanding China's AI Strategy by Gregory C. Allen (cnas.org)

In the second half of 2018, I traveled to China on four separate trips to attend major diplomatic, military, and private-sector conferences focusing on Artificial Intelligence (AI). During these trips, I participated in a series of meetings with high-ranking Chinese officials in China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, leaders of China’s military AI research organizations, government think tank experts, and corporate executives at Chinese AI companies. From these discussions – as well as my ongoing work analyzing China’s AI industry, policies, reports, and programs – I have arrived at a number of key judgments about Chinese leadership’s views, strategies, and prospects for AI as it applies to China’s economy and national security. Of course, China’s leadership in this area is a large population with diversity in its views, and any effort to generalize is inherently presumptuous and essentially guaranteed to oversimplify. However, the distance is large between prevailing views in American commentary on China’s AI efforts and what I have come to believe are the facts. I hope by stating my takeaways directly, this report will advance the assessment of this issue and be of benefit to the wider U.S. policymaking community.

Gregory C. Allen at the Center for a New American Security has produced a report with analysis and insights into China's AI strategy with national and cyber-security implications for the commercial, government, and military sectors.

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A story about how GO playing machines spurred China’s AI mission

The AI Cold War That Threatens Us All by an author (WIRED)

In Beijing, the machine’s victory cracked the air like a warning shot. That impression was only reinforced when, over the next few months, the Obama administration published a series of reports grappling with the benefits and risks of AI. The papers made a series of recommendations for government action, both to stave off potential job losses from automation and to invest in the development of machine learning. A group of senior policy wonks inside China’s science and technology bureaucracy, who had already been working on their own plan for AI, believed they were seeing signs of a focused, emerging US strategy—and they needed to act fast.

 

In May 2017, AlphaGo triumphed again, this time over Ke Jie, a Chinese Go master, ranked at the top of the world. Two months later, China unveiled its Next Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Plan, a document that laid out the country’s strategy to become the global leader in AI by 2030. And with this clear signal from Beijing, it was as if a giant axle began to turn in the machinery of the industrial state. Other Chinese government ministries soon issued their own plans, based on the strategy sketched out by Beijing’s planners. Expert advisory groups and industry alliances cropped up, and local governments all over China began to fund AI ventures.

Remember when the word computer was used to refer to a human being.

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