Riccardo Mori: macOS

Post-WWDC thoughts

... my general impression about where Mac OS is going is that Apple wants to turn it into a sort of low-maintenance system. The pretext is security: lock down this and that because it could be exploited; remove this and that because it’s code we can’t be bothered to update or optimise, it could potentially represent a vector for an attack, blah blah. Meanwhile, let’s also use these security measures to make the life of the already stressed-out Mac developers even harder.

In 30 years as a Mac power user, what I have been appreciating about Mac software was the ability to think and act outside the box, so to speak. In recent times, Apple seems hell-bent on keeping Mac software inside the box. The walled-garden model and paranoid security made and make definitely more sense on mobile systems. I appreciate being able to look for and install apps on my iPhone that won’t mess with my device or present a security risk for the operating system or for me as a user (although Apple hasn’t done a great job at keeping scams away from the App Store); but on the Mac I want to have more freedom of movement. I’m an expert user, I know the risks involved. Let me tinker. Give the option to have a locked-down Mac for novice users who expect to use it like an appliance, or in the same way they use their phones and tablets. Leave the ‘root’ door open for those who know what they’re doing.

Ditto!!! To be clear. I like my Apple devices. I spend thousands of dollars on Apple products for my family and me. I have the right to complain where I think things are not meeting my expectations. Apple is not infallible. Since Apple can’t be bothered to update the open-source components of their OS, I…

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fsck

The on-line hacker Jargon File, version 4.1.5, 24 SEP 1999 (catb.org)

:fscking: /fus'-king/ or /eff'-seek-ing/ adj. [Usenet; common]

Fucking, in the expletive sense (it refers to the Unix filesystem-repair command fsck(1), of which it can be said that if you have to use it at all you are having a bad day). Originated on {scary devil monastery} and the bofh.net newsgroups, but became much
more widespread following the passage of {CDA}. Also occasionally
seen in the variant "What the fsck?"

40 years of hacker culture in one document.

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How to Secure a new Linux WordPress Server

Welcome by an author (Daniel Brinneman)

The first line of defense in all of hosting and following sections I’ll write about, this being a subtle ‘zero’ or the least thought about topic of consideration, is your choice of usernames and passwords. I’ve had way too many clients always default to these two habits. The first is choosing a username that the whole of WordPress new sites used to have on install, ‘admin’ (no longer the case) and second, choosing a password that was easy for them to remember from anywhere. And then using that same combination on every single online account they had, even their personal accounts. Yikes! And even after I had generated a secure password for them, they changed it to something “easier” to remember. That always makes me feel extremely uneasy because I already can guess what’s in their site’s future. I have my clients’ best interest in mind when I generate those cumbersome passwords.

Update: Daniel moved his content to a new domain. This fixes a broken link. Let's hope I don't have to do this again. Fellow, Desk.pm user, Daniel Brinneman recent wrote an article on how to harden a WordPress website. Daniel's piece is well written and covers the basics. Please visit his site. While Daniel and…

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