Browsing Tag

unix

General

Riccardo Mori: macOS

To be clear. I like my Apple devices. I spend thousands of dollars on Apple products for my family and me. I have the right to complain where I think things are not meeting my expectations. Apple is not infallible. …

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General

fsck

The on-line hacker Jargon File, version 4.1.5, 24 SEP 1999 (catb.org) :fscking: /fus'-king/ or /eff'-seek-ing/ adj. [Usenet; common] Fucking, in the expletive sense (it refers to the Unix filesystem-repair command fsck(1), of which it can be said that if you have to use it at all you are having a bad day). Originated on {scary devil monastery} and the bofh.net newsgroups, but became much more widespread following the passage of {CDA}. Also occasionally seen in the variant "What the fsck?"…

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Tutorials

How to Secure a new Linux WordPress Server

Welcome by Daniel Brinneman (Daniel Brinneman) The first line of defense in all of hosting and following sections I’ll write about, this being a subtle ‘zero’ or the least thought about topic of consideration, is your choice of usernames and passwords. I’ve had way too many clients always default to these two habits. The first is choosing a username that the whole of WordPress new sites used to have on install, ‘admin’ (no longer the case) and second, choosing a…

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General

Why does the iPhone 5 seems boring?

Apple is not and will not make changes just for the sake of change. And while some may now be clamouring for this change, the paradox is that if Apple did make some big changes, many of the same people would bitch and moan about them. Apple is smart enough to know that in this case, most people don’t want change; they think that they do because that’s the easiest way to perceive value: visual newness. ~ MG Siegler I…

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Tutorials

Listing the largest file or sub-directory in the current directory

OS X Daily posted a tip on how to find the largest file in a directory.  I have my own that uses the du UNIX utility.  The du utility displays the file system usage statistics for each file and directory argument. To use it, type du in a Terminal window. The first column of output is the number of bytes and the second column is the directory path and file. If you run this utility in a directory with lots…

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