Tag: Skills Gap

Addressing the Cybersecurity Skills Gap

Are More Defined Parameters the Key to Addressing the Cybersecurity Skills Gap? (Security Intelligence)

...the skill sets required tend to be more diverse than other IT-related jobs. In addition to tech skills, cybersecurity jobs also require skills that align with liberal arts and humanities fields, such as communications and psychology. This has the potential to open the door to a wide range of candidates.

What’s missing is an accurate job description, said Wesley Simpson, chief operating officer with (ISC)2, during a conversation at the company’s Security Congress in October. Hiring managers who write up job descriptions often don’t have a complete understanding of the actual skill needs for these cybersecurity careers. There is a tendency to become enamored with certifications, which a person often can’t qualify for until they have years of job experience.

However, many of these jobs that “require” certifications are essentially entry-level jobs, so the people who should be applying for them don’t because they don’t carry certifications. On the other hand, people who do apply may be over-qualified and see the position as a lateral move, which could lead them to turn an offer down.

Is an inability to define security the main cause of the cybersecurity skills gap? If we can't truly define what security is, how can organizations design the right cybersecurity jobs for their needs?

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4 Tips to Creatively Close the Information Security Skills Gap

4 Tips to Creatively Close the Information Security Skills Gap by Joan GoodchildJoan Goodchild

In a competitive market for skilled candidates, Combs suggested it doesn’t hurt to take a dose of reality when it comes to your expectations for hiring. Begin by taking a hard look at your interview process.

“Most organizations have an interview process that is too long, with a lot of redundancy, and it’s low-touch,” Combs said. “They rely so much on technology for applications, but you can’t do that in security. It’s too sterile. If you want to be successful, then you need recruitment with real people who move quickly to communicate.”

Combs suggests testing your interview process so you know what the process is like as an outsider. The timeline should be a consideration, too. Investing time in finding the right person is OK, but it should be reasonable, Combs said.

“As long as you drag your feet, the candidate is going to have other options and ultimately may choose to go elsewhere. And in this market, they can,” Combs said.

Joan Goodchild offers creative tips for companies looking to hire and develop information security talent.

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