Google's "Snake oil salesman!"

In my opinion, this is a load of bullcrap! "Open source is different than a community-driven project," Rubin said, in which a broad collection of people collectively determine the software's future. "Android is light on the community-driven side and heavy on open source." That's on purpose: "When we add new APIs, typically, in my opinion,…

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HTC Willfully Violates the GPL in T-Mobile's New G2 Android Phone

HTC Willfully Violates the GPL in T-Mobile's New G2 Android Phone by an author (Freedom to Tinker)

Perhaps HTC (and T-Mobile, distributor of the phone) should review the actual contents of the GNU Public License (v2), which stipulate the legal requirements for modifying and redistributing Linux. They state that you may only distribute derivative code if you “[a]ccompany it with the complete corresponding machine-readable source code.” Notably, there is no mention of a “grace period” or the like.

Steve Schultze, Associate Director at the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University, accuses HTC of violating the GPL with the G2. One of the commenters points out that Android licensing is a bit more complicated. Google uses Apache license for most of Android, which gives freedom to developers (carriers), including freedom to make…

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The Key To An Open Source Social Network Is Still People

The Key To An Open Source Social Network Is Still People (OS Static)

At OSCON, today’s popular social networking services were compared to the closed systems of the 1990s. In those days, it wasn’t uncommon to, say, need to be on MCI Mail or CompuServe to be able to send another person on one of those services a message. They were closed e-mail systems. People didn’t tolerate that, and the current argument is that they won’t tolerate walled gardens among social networking services either.

The problem is, though, that they are tolerating that walled gardens—in spades. How can anyone argue with 500 million users? The people voted, and there is the result. It’s unlikely at this point that we will see an open source platform turn Facebook into AOL.

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