The restaurant has been in business for eight months but this was my first time ordering from Midori. My sister-in-law orders from Midori a lot. It’s interesting that she finds new restaurants in our town before we do. I guess we don’t eat out often.

I stopped in just after I finished up my business at the bank. It was close to lunch time and wanted to treat myself. A mini celebration of sorts. I had just won a 7 month contract with a major client. So I ordered three rolls — spicy tuna, spicy salmon and an avocado roll.

I chatted a bit with the guy who took my order. Unlike most restaurant in the area Midori does delivery and takes orders online. Online orders get a 10% discount.

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My meal was packaged in a simple but hefty brown paper bag. As I mentioned I don’t order take out often but I think this bag is better than most I’ve seen.

The restaurant provided ample amounts of soy sauce , wasabi and ginger. My meal also included a cup of miso soup. I didn’t order the soup but it was a nice surprise.

The spicy tuna and salmon wasn’t as spicy as I had hoped. The restaurant is probably catering to the typically bland North American palate.

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I love spring but I have severe allergies to certiain North American plants. I say that specifically because I keep tropical plants in my home and at my desk at work. I’m not allergic to any of those. Just oak, birch etc.

Despite the allergies — the itchy eyes, the runny nose, the incessant sneezing — I love spring. It’s one of my favourite times of the year. I love the fresh smell of a spring morning just after the rains have stopped. The air is crisp and the it feels as though all the dirt and wear has been washed away. Spring feels new and invigorating. Spring means renewal and change.

I often wish my job was like that. It used to be. It used to be that I would jump out of bed in the morning eager and ready to put my talents to work solving some new business technology problems.

But it’s less like that now. Each day I feel trapped. The joy — the creativity and the innovation — have been outsourced and what’s left is … well just a job. Like spring, maybe it’s time for a change.

We have a saying in Hebrew that it’s much easier to look for a lost key under the light, than to look for the key where you actually lost it, because it’s dark over there. That’s exactly how (North American airport security officials) act,” Sela said. “You can easily do what we do. You don’t have to replace anything. You have to add just a little bit — technology, training. But you have to completely change the way you go about doing airport security. And that is something that the bureaucrats have a problem with. They are very well enclosed in their own concept.

Rafi Sela, the president of AR Challenges, a global transportation security consultancy on how Israeli airports handle security