Put a Tesla in Ludicrous mode

Nikon Expectations by Thom Hogan (dslrbodies.com)

What to expect from Nikon in the short term

Nikon needed a DX mirrorless entry a year ago. They could have launched with only a couple of lenses and a lens roadmap and done just fine. Now they're racing from behind. Far behind.

Nikon needed an FX mirrorless entry this buying season. One that deals with the D6xx/Df crowd and could hold serve against any upcoming Sony A7 Mark III. That, too, could have launched with a couple of lenses and a lens roadmap and done just fine.

So we're about to see if Nikon has a miracle accelerator in their arsenal. Don't laugh. Put a Tesla in Ludicrous mode and it will smoke any Detroit entrant so bad you might have time to walk out on the course to see if the gas eater is still coming. Technology can change the game.

If he’s correct, perhaps it’s a good thing my Nikon broke.

Nikon's Snapbridge and Mobile Apps

Professional photographer Thom Hogan:

Just a word of warning to Nikon Japan: if you're going to live in the mobile world, you'll have to work by mobile world timeframes. That means that you're exhaustively testing every beta release of an OS before it's released, and scrambling to address any problems that might appear within days of the final release, and preferably even before the final release. And good luck with the yearly hardware changes Apple, et.al., are iterating. Keeping up with Silicon Valley is not a 9-to-5, five-day-a-week job. It's 247 and a fire drill every hour.

That should be the Japanese companies’ mantra too: building hardware/software solutions that keep up with the world means you have to constantly be tinkering, updating, fixing, and yes, adding, to your products. SnapBridge is now almost two years old as a Nikon initiative, and it’s nine-months old in terms of being out in the wild. Any new features? Nope. Fixed the major problems? Nope. Lots of iterative updates? Nope. Nikon is trying to use old school tech product cycles in a world that lives on last night’s build. And tomorrow it will live on tonight’s build. Nikon’s still trying to get last year’s build to work.

Spider on Yellow

Spider on Yellow was created whole practicing the so-called Brenizer panorama method. I am not too happy with the results. I think the technique works best on portraits of people. Maybe I'll convince my wife or daughter to model for me.

The difficulty for me was in maintaining a stable subject distance while hand holding my Nikon. Also, the flower was moving slightly in the wind.

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Spider on Yellow
Can you find the spider?
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The image below is the Brenizer image I created.

A Brenizer panorama created in Photoshop using 16 images.
A Brenizer panorama created in Photoshop using 16 images.
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