Lens-Artists Weekly Photo Challenge #46 – Delicate by Leya (Leya)

We have buried so much of the delicate magic of life  – D.H. Lawrence

On my walks in the forest, I love everything fresh, fragile and delicate that spring brings to nature – the feeling of looking at the world for the first time. Rebirth. Renewal. The importance of a living planet Earth for our children and grandchildren to be a part of, echoes with every step.

This week, the challenge must be Delicate. To me, Spring itself reveals something of the very essence of the word – Delicate. I hope you will enjoy walking with me, meeting some spring flowers from my ramblings!

Sherry Felix posted a recent blog entry with an assortment of flowers and plants in Central Park. I commented that I had planted some Aquilegia canadensis aka Wild Columbine in a deck planer a while back, that I was considering moving to my garden. Sherry was helpful in calming my worries about deer eating the delicate wildflowers. Columbine is a deer-resistant native plant. I bought my Columbine from a native plant nursery.

Wild columbine is a native herbaceous perennial that can be found in woodlands and rocky slopes. I have not seen any columbine in the wild on my hikes in the Sourland Mountain Preserve. I expect they can be found off-trail. The rocky slopes of the area are perfect for this plant. The plant grows to about 91cm.

Perhaps it’s a mere coincidence but this week, the Lens-Artists Weekly Photo Challenge is Delicate. Ann-Christine/Leya is hosting. I immediately thought of my columbine plants.

I don’t have a macro lens for my Fuji X-T2. The images here were shot on my Fujinon XF16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR lens.

FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ (55 mm, 0.001 sec at f/5.6, ISO400), © Khürt L. Williams
Columbine —FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ (55 mm, 0.003 sec at f/5.6, ISO400), © Khürt L. Williams
Columbine —FujiFilm X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR @ (55 mm, 0.001 sec at f/5.6, ISO400), © Khürt L. Williams

Grass_NIKON D5100_20150422_5850

There are 40.5 million acres of lawn in the United States, more than double the size of the country’s largest national forest. We disconnect ourselves from wildlife habitat loss by viewing it as a problem caused by industry and agriculture. But habitat loss isn’t a problem happening out there somewhere; it’s happening in our own back yards.