Kodak Tri-X Pan - Expired

The first time I exposed a roll of Kodak Tri-X pan 400 (TX400) was during The January Term (J-Term) at Drew University. J-Term was a four-week academic term during which students took intensive courses on various subjects, often focusing on experiential learning. In 1988, Drew University offered a J-Term photography course covering black and white photography, documentary photography, or photojournalism. The coursework included classroom lectures, discussions, hands-on photography exercises, and field trips to locations in the surrounding area for photography assignments.

In the 1980s, photography was synonymous with "film photography", and the most popular format was 35mm. I bought myself a Pentax P3 with an SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/1.8 lens somewhere in New York City. Or maybe Flushing, Queens. It was long ago, and I don't remember those details. Along with Ilford HP5, the Kodak Tri-X Pan 400 was one of the first 35mm film stocks I used. That was mainly because it was inexpensive compared to 35mm colour film and cheaper to develop in the on-campus lab.

I was excited when I found an expired cartridge of Kodak Tri-X pan in the box my friend sent me. The packaging was damaged, but a sticker on the side showed the expiration date, March 1980. The film in my hand was over 40 years old!

When film expires, it can lose sensitivity to light, resulting in lower contrast and less detail in the shadows and highlights. The wisdom of the Interweb suggested that I should overexpose this expired film by one stop for each decade after the expiration date. I carefully loaded the roll into my Minolta XD-11 and set the ASA to 50.

The unpredictability of expired 35mm film means that not all images turn out as expected. Would the expired roll still produce images when exposed?

Wow! These are bad. I do not know what those streaky patterns are. I've not seen anything like this with any of the rolls of expired 35mm film I have exposed over the last 18 months. That's $6 down the toilet.

Expired Kodak Tri-X 400 Pan · 15 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2
Expired Kodak Tri-X 400 Pan · 15 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2
Expired Kodak Tri-X 400 Pan · 15 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2
Name Kodak Tri-X Pan
Price FREE
Type C41
Native ISO 400
Exposed ISO 50
Format 35mm
Features Fine grain. Natural colour reproduction. High contrast.
Lab Boutique Film Lab
Scanner Epson Perfection V600
Software VueScan 9
Expired Kodak Tri-X 400 Pan · 15 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2

Experience Report: Minolta XD-11

A "new to me" Minolta X-700 camera made me fall in like with 35mm film photography again. A "new to me" XD-11 made me jump for joy.

The Minolta X-700 was the pinnacle of Minolta's final manual-focus SLR camera series. Minolta made X-700s for 20 years starting in 1981. Minolta aimed the X-700 at the advanced amateur, giving it aperture priority and program autoexposure. The novice photographer twisted the lens until the viewfinder image was crisp and then pressed the shutter button. The X-700 took care of the rest.

A used Minolta X-700 camera reignited my passion for 35mm film photography. It's funny how certain cameras click with you, pun intended. My Pentax SP II and ES II were nostalgic buys, but using them felt more like a chore than a joy.

In the summer of 2020, I took my X-700 for a day trip with Bhavna down the shore, and I had an entirely exciting experience. The X-700 just felt right in my hands, and the shots I got were some of my favourites.

That experience sparked my curiosity to dig deeper into the world of Minolta cameras. It's incredible how the right camera can inspire and motivate you to explore your craft further. Now, I'm on a journey to learn all there is to know about Minolta's gems. Who knows what photographic adventures lie ahead?

While aperture priority shooting is my default for any camera, I was concerned that there would be action shots where exposure priority would be needed. Did Minolta have an exposure-priority 35mm film camera that was as fun to use as the X-700? My search discovered that Minolta had created a professional-quality modern multimode Minolta "X series" SLRs mostly made of metal- the XD-5, XDs, XD-7 and XD-11.

Minolta had some interesting naming conventions for its products, making a point to have distinct names in the Japanese, European and US markets for almost everything. The XD-7 is the European and Japanese market version of the XD-11: same camera, different badge. The XD-11 was sold in silver and black models. I found many silver-bodied XD-11s for sale online, but I prefer the black body. The black model was more expensive, and consequently, fewer were sold. Thus, the black XD-11 body is much more costly and desirable in today's used market. After several weeks of searching eBay, Etsy, KEH and anywhere else that sold film cameras, I found an XD-11 body on Facebook Marketplace. After a quick negotiation on price and an agreement that I would pay shipping instead of collecting in person, my "new-to-me" camera arrived from Pennsylvania.

The X series uses Minolta MD and MC mount lenses. Unlike MC lenses, MD lenses have an extra coupling arm for use with multimode metering. The older MC (Meter Coupled) lenses can be used on "X series" cameras but not in the exposure-priority mode.

Minolta XD-11
Minolta XD-11 · Friday 1 January 2021 · FujiFilm X-T2 · XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR

My XD-11 camera was sold as "body-only", but this was not a problem since I already had a standard MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 and a JC Penny 80-200 Zoom that came with the Minolta X-700. The MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 is a superlens, but I prefer a field of view closer to that of the human eye for general use. A few months later, I purchased an MD Rokkor-X 45mm f/2 lens, a versatile manual focus lens often hailed for its solid performance and compact design. Its 45mm focal length falls within the "normal" range, making it great for everyday photography. This became my primary lens for the XD-11.

Released in 1977, the XD11 was the world's first camera with aperture priority, shutter priority, and a fully metered manual mode.
Minolta developed the XD-11 in conjunction with Leitz, with some websites claiming that the body was the basis for the Leica R4 and, later, as the chassis for the Leica R5, R6 and R7. Leica introduced a more advanced metering system into the body (including spot metering). Still, most other camera features are evident in both bodies.

Inside the film bay, the take-up spool and rewind crank are about as vanilla as possible. Pull up on the crank when loading film, and the door opens. The take-up spool grabs the film leader with authority and pulls it around and into place without hinting at a missed load. Unlike the X-700, the XD-11 has a film load indicator, a minor but delightful feature in a few other era cameras.

The XD-11's fresnel, micro prism spot viewfinder screen is about efficiency. Metered manual mode conveniently displays your chosen aperture and shutter speed, so you don't have to look away. This keeps you immersed in the shot, helping you maintain your creative flow and ensuring accurate settings simultaneously.

Minolta XD-11
Minolta XD-11 · Friday 1 January 2021 · FujiFilm X-T2 · XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR

The XD-11 camera features a Silicon photocell TTL centre weighted meter, which uses silicon photocells to measure light for exposure accurately. This metering system prioritises the central part of the frame when calculating exposure, striking a balance between accuracy and simplicity. This technology made the XD-11 a reliable choice for photographers.

The ASA range of the XD-11 camera typically spans from ASA 25 to ASA 1600. Remember that these are traditional film sensitivity settings, as digital cameras nowadays use ISO to indicate sensitivity. While I have exposed a 35mm roll of RPX 25, I'm not fond of grain, so I will likely never expose 35mm film at ASA higher than 400.

The Minolta XD-11 uses two 1.5v silver button (S76/SR44) batteries. It can be used without batteries but will lose automatic exposure and light meter functions. You'd need to set exposure manually using your knowledge or an external light meter. If you're comfortable with manual settings, it's feasible; otherwise, having fresh batteries would maintain the camera's automatic features.

The Depth of Field (DoF) preview button on the XD-11 camera lets you check how much of your scene will be in focus at the selected aperture. It's a helpful feature for adjusting focus and composition before capturing the shot.

The "safe-load" indicator on the XD-11 is a valuable feature that helps users load film accurately, minimising the risk of misalignment or incomplete loading. It provides a visual confirmation that the film is securely in place, assuring the overall reliability of the camera during the film-loading process.

Minolta XD-11
Minolta XD-11 with MD Rokkor-X 45mm F:2 · Friday 1 January 2021 · FujiFilm X-T2 · XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR

The Self-timer on the XD-11 offers a delay option for hassle-free self-portraits or group shots. It's a handy feature that lets you compose your shot before the shutter clicks.

Shutter priority mode on the XD-11 lets you choose the desired shutter speed while the camera handles the aperture. It's handy for controlling motion in your shots, whether freezing action with a high speed or adding motion blur with a low one. It strikes a nice balance between manual control and convenience.

The XD-11 camera has a Seiko electronically controlled metal focal plane shutter with step-less speeds from 1/1000 to 1 second in automatic and stepped speeds, including "B" in metered manual mode. Flash sync operates at 1/100s with the "X" shutter dial setting. The XD-11 offers full mechanical operation at settings "O" (1/100 sec) and "B." In shutter priority mode, it provides electronic automatic aperture control and a final check metering system. This ensures exposure accuracy by stopping the lens down for assessment, a feature shared with the Minolta X-700. The XD-11 combines electronic innovation with mechanical reliability for precise photographic outcomes.

The Minolta XD-11 offers an exposure compensation range of around ±2 EV in 13 EV steps. This allows you to adjust brightness by up to two stops in either direction for creative control in your film photography.

The Minolta XD-11 weighs about 620 grams (1.37 pounds) and measures around 142mm (5.6 inches) in width, 92mm (3.6 inches) in height and 48mm (1.9 inches) in depth. Minolta balanced a solid build and manageable weight for that era.

I've had experience with 35mm film SLRs, so using the XD-11 was old hat. However, I took the time to review the manual to ensure I was using it correctly. Unless mentioned otherwise, all the photos were taken using the aperture-priority mode.

Brick Farm Tavern July 4th BBQ
Brick Farm Tavern July 4th BBQ · Saturday 3 July 2021 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2
Beneduce Vineyards Gewürztraminer
Beneduce Vineyards Gewürztraminer · Saturday 14 August 2021 · Minolta XD-11 · MD ROKKOR-X 45mm F2
Race Street, Frenchtown
Race Street, Frenchtown · Sunday 19 December 2021 · Minolta XD-11 · MD ROKKOR-X 50mm F1.7
Bhavna · Saturday 22 January 2022 · Minolta XD-11 · MD ROKKOR-X 45mm F2
Asbury Park Boardwalk
Asbury Park Boardwalk · Sunday 24 April 2022 · Minolta XD-11 · MD ROKKOR-X 45mm F2
Asbury Park Boardwalk
Kingston Locktender's House · Sunday 5 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2

If you like Minolta SLRs, you might also enjoy my reviews of the XD-11, the X-700, and the XG-1. Or check out all of my camera reviews here.

Kodak Professional Portra 400BW - Expired

I exposed another expired 35mm roll of Kodak Portra 400 BW.

I'm unsure why or how it happened, but I exposed almost an entire cartridge of expired Kodak Professional Portra 400BW with pictures of my orange tabby, Alphonso Mango. I had written "snow day" in my notes, but when I looked at the scans, I realised that I had also written the same thing on the notes for the expired Ilford HP5 400 I had exposed the previous day. I intended to expose both cartridges from the box of expired 35mm film during the snow. But ... I didn't.

Kodak Professional Portra 400BW was a multi-purpose chromogenic black and white negative film designed to be processed in standard C-41 chemistry alongside rolls of colour negative film and printed on traditional colour paper. It was developed like a colour-negative film in the C-41 process and delivered monochrome images like a black-and-white film. The film was intended for exposure with daylight, electronic flash, and artificial illumination. Kodak Professional Portra 400BWW was a versatile film for 35mm and medium format cameras. It was made with a Kodak T-Grain emulsion and had a wide exposure latitude. Production of the Kodak Portra 400BW was discontinued and replaced with Kodak Professional BW400CN, which was also discontinued. This film incorporated Kodak T-GRAIN® emulsions, which provided wonderful grain and sharpness at a relatively high speed. This film was used for portrait and wedding applications and many commercial applications.

The first time I used Kodak Porta 400BW, I exposed it at box speed. I realised then that I needed to overexpose the expired film. I exposed this 35mm roll of Kodak Professional Portra 400BW at ISO 100. The results are much better. But I think ISO 160 may have produced better results.

The film cartridge was developed at Boutique Photo Lab and scanned on my Epson Perfection V600 with VueScan 9. I processed the negative scans using Negatvibe Lab Pro, adjusted the exposure by -1/3 EV in Adobe Lightroom and cropped out the film borders.

Name Kodak Professional Portra 400BW
Price FREE
Native ISO 400
Format 35mm
Features chromogenic black and white negative
Exposed ISO 100
Lab Boutique Film Lab
Process C41
Scanner Epson Perfection V600
Software VueScan 9, Negative Lab Pro, Adobe Lightroom
Alphonso Mango · Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Alphonso Mango · Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Alphonso Mango · Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Alphonso Mango · Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Alphonso Mango · Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400
Alphonso Mango · Tuesday 7 March 2023 · Minolta XD-11 · MD Rokkor-X 45mm F2 · ISO 400