Zapping Instagram pics to Micro.blog by Carl Rustung (Carl Rustung)

I recently did a little site update. The biggest change was connecting it to my Micro.blog and syndicating the posts here. Micro.blog, in turn, picked up my Instagram posts, routing them over here as well. This was done using a cool, little service called OwnYourGram.

Though a brilliant (and free!) initiative, it didn’t work very well. It was hard to keep track of just when it would reroute my pics, and the other day it stopped working completely. The error message was kinda vague, so I have no idea who’s to blame – might be OwnYourGram, might be micro.blog… might be me.

Anyway, I’d recently set up Zapier to tell Netlify to update my site whenever I’d posted something new to micro.blog, so I thought I’d check if it could also do my Instagram sharing for me. Turns out it could!

I don’t post to Instagram as often as I used to. I prefer to post images to my website first. But I thought it would be useful to pull in my Instagram updates to micro.blog. My Instagram is set to point to my WordPress.org website for “backfeed” responses. OwnYourGram is not a solution for me.

The instructions provided by @CarlRustung were easy for me to follow. It works!

Update: I used the same method to pull in posts from Untappd.

Ambient Intimacy by Patrick Rhone

As many know, I’ve been hanging out on Twitter less and less these days. I rarely post a tweet and I only check into the timeline, maybe, once a day. I do have the ability to cross post things from my blog/micro.blog to Twitter but, well, I deliberately do not want to give Twitter the corporation anything of mine of that sort of value. So, I don’t.

Otherwise, I’m doing most of my posting, reading, and discussing over on Micro.blog (which I really love). That said, Micro.blog is a platform for blogging, both short (i.e. tweet length) and long posts. It’s not the sort of thing I would post “What are you doing?” type status answers on because, well, I’m posting to my blog and, outside of context and mixed with other things, those would make for very curious blog posts.

Twitter, on the other hand, is still… Well… Twitter. Though the platform, community, and the question it asks you has morphed, the essence of how the platform can be frictionlessly used for status updates remains in place. And, that’s how I plan to use it going forward — at least for a while. A combination of Drafts on my iOS devices and Twizzy on the Mac means I can quickly do so without interacting with the timeline at all.

After reading Patrick’s short post, I want to try this experiment as well. I also have used Twitter less and less. I have used all of the social networks less this year than in the past. But not for the continuous angst-ridden reason some people have. I wasn’t excited anymore. Perhaps a return to the basics will help. I don’t know, but it’s worth a try.