The Yoink app is an OS X masOS) app that simplifies and improves drag-and-drop between windows, apps, spaces and fullscreen apps. Yoink was written by independent software developer Matthias Gansrigler who lives in Vienna, Austria.

Once installed, when I start dragging files in Finder or content from an application, Yoink fades in a tiny window either at the edge of my screen or adjacent to the mouse cursor. I can then drop content onto the window where it will sit until I drag it somewhere else. Having the Yoink window appear right next to the cursor makes dragging to it is easier.

Once the files are in Yoink, I use the mouse to comfortably navigate to the destination of the files --either in Finder or another application -- and then continue the drag from the app's window. If the destination is on the same storage volume as the original, the file is moved; if the destination is on a different volume, the file is copied. This mimics the behaviours that users expect from Finder.

Yoink accepts any file from Finder and app content from almost any Cocoa app -- JPEG from Safari or the file system, PDF, etc.
So I can move or copy files to a different folder or hard drive on my Mac or collect images from a website or text snippets from documents before I move them to the desired destination.

Stacks

When multiple files are dragged to Yoink, they’re combined into a something the developer calls a "Stack". This makes dragging them out together very easy. Stacks can be split up, so individual files are can be dragged as well.

Customize

Yoink

I set up Yoink to ignore apps where I don’t need it. I have customised where and when the app window will appear to make it fit my workflow and daily routines. For instance, I configured the app not to show up at my screen’s edge, but directly at my mouse cursor, making moving large numbers of image files easier.

Yoink

App name: Yoink app
Category: Utilities
Version: 3.2
Supported devices: OS X Lion 10.7.3 or newer required
Cost: $6.99
Developer and operator: Matthias Gansrigler, © 2016, Eternal Storms Software

My son was being ragged on by one of his friends who apparently hated Apple products and Apple itself. His friend builds his own Windows gaming computers from parts ordered online and has an Android OS smart phone. I think he was also messing around with Linux.

This friend was constantly making "Macs suck!" statement to my son and questioning his use of his iPhone, iPad and iMac. My son would come home asking me how to get this friend to “leave it alone”. I told my son that the best strategy was to simply agree with his friend that he was right. To use the “Macs sucks” argument but in a different way.

But this summer, I met the kid and we had a conversation which ended with him agreeing that his choices are the best for him but aren’t the best choices for everyone. While I don't remember the exact details of our conversation, here's the gist of the "because Macs suck" argument I used.

Macs suck because you can’t open them up and upgrade/fix things yourself. Instead you have to buy what you need and then you get one year of FREE in person tech support or phone support from someone who’s native language is English. If there is an issue they patiently work with you to fix it. For FREE. This sucks because you really wanted to spend your weekends fixing your computers.

Yes, Macs suck because you don’t have to buy and install each new OS release yourself while trying to figure out if your system is compatible. Instead 7 years from initial purchase you can still run the latest compatible OS and install it yourself for FREE in the time it takes to get an oil change at the Jiffy Lube1. This sucks because you don’t get to find and compile the source code for that driver or application that stopped working.

Macs suck because instead of searching on the Internet for apps which may or may not contain malware, you are forced to use the App Store to install digitally signed and approved apps which are free of malware. Macs suck because you can also search the Internet and install apps that may or may not contain malware. Macs suck because you have the choice of shopping i the safety at the Mall or at trying your luck at the flea market. This sucks because you don’t get to spend exercise your skills in removing malware.

Macs suck because they are designed to work with other Apple products in ways that increase the value beyond each product separately. This sucks because you really enjoy the hours trying to get your smartphone to sync up your photos to your computer.

Yes, Macs suck.

What other reason can you list for why Macs suck? Leave a note in the comments section.


  1. My brother-in-laws 2007 iMac is running OS X 10.11.2 "El Capitan". 

A colleague posted this question to our Mac Users' discussion group.

Anyone have an suggestions on an SSH client that can save sessions kinds like a manager. Yea I use Putty (windows) or terminal window (Mac) , but I guess I am looking for a more full featured client and curious what folks out there use.

I found the question a bit odd since OS X Terminal has session management. To setup things up, launch Terminal and select "New Remote Shell" from the Shell menu.

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Select the service you want to set up, enter the information for the service, and then click + to save the service. Now that you have set up the remote connections you can launch Terminal and access them by selecting "New Remote Shell" from the Shell menu.

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Since I created a remote session for the SSH connections I need to manage my servers, Terminal will open a new window for each service. his leave can create a messy desktop. If you have a lot of remote sessions that you access routinely together, you can get access to them as a group.

First I merge all open windows into tabs.

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Then I saved the tabs as a window grouping. These commands can be found in the Windows menu of Terminal.

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Now that I have the remote sessions organised into windows groups I can launch them when I want.

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