Google Labs developed a diabetes glucose meter inside a contact lens.

An early, outsourced clinical research study with real patients was encouraging, but there are many potential pitfalls yet to come, said University of North Carolina diabetes researcher Dr. John Buse, who was briefed by Google on the lens last week.

“This has the potential to be a real game changer,” he said, “but the devil is in the details.”

Among those is figuring out how to correlate glucose levels in tears as compared with blood. And what happens on windy days, while chopping onions or during very sad movies? As with any medical device, it would need to be tested and proved accurate, safe, and at least as good as other types of glucose sensors available now to win FDA approval.Associated Press in the Washington Post

I’m skeptical. I’ve seen so many attempts at making pain-free-zero-blood glucose meters. All have failed to produce accurate and consistent results. It would seem there is no substitute to measuring blood serum.

Imagine a world where the artificial pancreas is available to everyone who needs it. A world where we wake up in the morning, our blood glucose is reset. A world where we don’t have to stop and think all the time. A world where we get a guaranteed A1c in target that will protect us from complications. Imagine the ‘health dividend’ that the artificial pancreas will create – that would have an enormous long-term impact on healthcare costs. Imagine equally as much change as we have seen since our last meeting in 2010. We look forward to watching our world, following it, writing about it, and to preparing to live a life that is more normal, healthy, productive, and predictable.[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][Kelly Close (diaTribe, San Francisco, CA)](http://diatribe.us/issues/54/quotable-quotes) on how an artificial pancreas would be life-changing for people with type 1 diabetes. Her comments were met with a round of applause at the FDA/JDRF/NIH Workshop on Innovation Towards an Artificial Pancreas, Bethesda, MD, April 9-10, 2013.[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Because of a regulatory Catch-22, the airport X-ray scanners have escaped the oversight required for X-ray machines used in doctors’ offices and hospitals. The reason is that the scanners do not have a medical purpose, so the FDA cannot subject them to the rigorous evaluation it applies to medical devices.

So I’ve got to make a “choice” between having my genitals groped or irradiated?

(via Michael Grabell)