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Sharing to Facebook from Lightroom Classic and Lightroom CC Discontinued by Laura Shoe (Laura Shoe's Lightroom Training Tutorials and Tips)

What you may have heard is true – as of August 1, 2018 you’ll no longer be able to share to Facebook from Lightroom Classic (or from earlier versions, such as Lightroom 6) or from the cloud-based Lightroom CC desktop application. Facebook will no longer allow desktop applications to post to Facebook (using its API anyway, which is how Lightroom has done it.)

Brid.gy’s developer, Ryan Barrett removed Facebook support from the WordPress plugin several months ago. Earlier this week Automattic removed the ability of the Publicize feature of JetPack and WordPress.com to publish to personal Facebook profiles. And now Adobe is doing the same for Adobe Lightroom.

I won't miss it. My use of Facebook has dropped off considerably over the last few months. I have also realized that I don't care about publishing links to my blog content to Facebook or Twitter or Google+. I just don't care that much anymore.

Troon Brewing, Hopewell, New Jersey, Barn

In 2016 I posted about my about my iPhone 6 photography kit which was an update from the photography kit I used in 2015. I bought an iPhone 7 last year and changed my photography kit only slightly but I made some changes to how I process my mobile images.

NOTE: Lightroom CC refers to the new cloud-based desktop version of Lightroom. Lightroom Classic CC refers to the regular desktop version of Lightroom. Lightroom CC mobile refers to the iOS versions of Lightroom CC.

Capture

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom for iOS was released several years ago, has gone through several iterations including a recent name change. Originally a standalone app, Adobe has made the mobile app an integral part of its Creative Cloud (CC) strategy and added features along the way. Over the last year, this free mobile app, now call Lightroom CC, along with an Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan subscription, has become my go-to software for all my iPhone photography.

My Creative Cloud Photography subscription includes the Adobe Lightroom Classic CC and Photoshop CC desktop app. Apple added RAW support to iOS starring with version 10. Adobe added RAW/DNG support to Lightroom CC mobile soon after.

The app has three shooting modes — High Dynamic Range, Automatic, and Professional. The Professional capture mode gives me complete control over essential camera settings like the shutter speed, the ISO, exposure, and the white balance. Lightroom CC mobile focus mode has a feature that simulates the “focus peaking” feature found on many mirrorless cameras. A green outline around the edge of the objects show the features that are in focus.

Lightroom CC for mobile has Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) mode for creating RAW (DNG format) High Dynamic Range (HDR) images. Three images are captured and then aligned, merged, and de-ghosted within the app to create a high dynamic range composite. With the HDR mode, I get a 16-bit floating point image with the full flexibility of a traditional raw file plus the expanded dynamic range of a multi-frame HDR blend.

Processing

Adobe Lightroom CC mobile’s key feature is its synchronization with the desktop versions of Lightroom CC. This Lightroom CC feature syncs developed photos easily between an iPad, Mobile, or Mac.

Lightroom CC mobile has easy-to-use sliders, filters, and quick adjustment tools. Edits on my iPhone are automatically synced everywhere else. I can shoot on my iPhone and edit on my iPad or Mac.

Just like in Lightroom Classic CC on my iMac, I can pretty much adjust everything about an image via Lightroom CC for iOS. Lightroom CC mobile contains all the image adjustments found in the Basic panel of Lightroom Classic CC desktop’s Develop module, such as white balance, exposure, contrast, clarity, and vibrancy. It also includes several presets for applying black-and-white and colour filters (landscape, portrait, and vivid), specific looks, and tones; and a crop tool that can straighten, rotate, or lock the photo’s visible area to specific aspect ratios.

The details section inside Lightroom CC mobile gives me control over sharpness, as well as adding noise reduction tools. I use those a lot. The iPhone 7 sensor is subpar in low light situations. I created a preset in Lightroom CC mobile as a default starting point for my editing.

The one thing lacking that I wish Adobe will do something about is that presets in Lightroom Classic CC cannot be synced to Lightroom CC mobile. However, Lightroom CC users can use the same presets between desktop and mobile. Presets imported through that Lightroom CC desktop version will now sync via the cloud to the mobile apps. The same synchronization also works with colour profiles. The feature works with both purchased third-party presets and user-generated presets.

Like on Lightroom CC desktop, the Lightroom CC mobile app uses the edits already applied to the selected photo to create a new preset. I can select which adjustments to include in the user created preset.

Stabilization

I’m pretty good at holding my iPhone 7 steady while taking photos but long exposure and HDR require that the camera remains stationary. A few years ago I bought a small Manfrotto tripod that I use to use with my iPhone.

The tripod is lightweight, portable and rugged. It's small enough to fit inside a long coat or small backpack. The tripod has a push-button locking adjustment, so I can position the tripod head just where I need it.

You can learn more about Adobe Lightroom CC on Adobe's website.

Complete Kit

My mobile photography workflow is snap, edit, post. The Manfrotto tripod and two camera apps are all I need to create compelling photographs with my iPhone.

Adobe Lightroom CC + iPhone 7 back camera @ 3.99mm, 1/1400 sec at f/1.8, ISO 20

lightroom

Automattic recently released a plugin for Adobe Lightroom that instantly simplified my photography publishing workflow. The plugin allows the user to export images direct from Lightroom to WordPress.com or a self-hosted WordPress website.

Installing, configuring and using the plugin was straightforward and easy. I’ll explain how it’s done.

Installation

Download the plug from WordPress.com and unzip the plugin file. The plugin has the following file name: wordpress.com.lrplugin. Launch Adobe Lightroom and navigate to the Plug-in Manager. On the Mac, you can find the entry under the File menu. Alternatively, use a Mac keyboard shortcut ...

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From the Plug-in Manager winder click add in the bottom left corner of the plugin manager, navigate to the location of the wordpress.com.lrplugin file and select the plugin.

I suggest copying the wordpress.com.lrplugin file to the folder where Lightroom keeps the rest of its plugins. You can find this easily.

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Select one of the pre-installed plug-ins in the left pane of the Plug-in Manager. Then click the Show in Finder button in the Status section. On MacOS, this will open a Finder window to this location.

Copy — drag, and drop — the wordpress.com.lrplugin to the Adobe Lightroom plugin folder, then restart Adobe Lightroom. The plug-in is now installed.

Setup

Setup for a WordPress.com or self-hosted WordPress.org website is done the same way. However, to upload to your self-hosted WordPress (.org) website, you need to install the Jetpack plugin, which you can do by following the instructions on WordPress.com.

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Click the Log In button. This will launch your browser. You will have to log in and authorized the plugin to use your WordPress.com. You will be taken back to Adobe Lightroom once the connection is approved. Once that is done, make sure your site is selected from the drop-down list.

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That’s it. In the past, I had used another plugin called Photo Upload to export from Lightroom to WordPress. However, that plugin was more challenging to set up and use and is not free. The free WordPress plugin is as easy as to use as selecting one or more images in Lightroom, clicking the Lightroom export button and picking my blog.