Sunday Paper

The internet of things (IoT) is polluted.

The market can't fix this because neither the buyer nor the seller cares. Think of all the CCTV cameras and DVRs used in the attack against Brian Krebs. The owners of those devices don't care. Their devices were cheap to buy, they still work, and they don't even know Brian. The sellers of those devices don't care: they're now selling newer and better models, and the original buyers only cared about price and features. There is no market solution because the insecurity is what economists call an externality: it's an effect of the purchasing decision that affects other people. Think of it kind of like invisible pollution.
Security Economics of the Internet of Things

The last mambabatok is over 99 years old. How will she preserve her culture?

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I don't have an office.

In the 1990s I worked in an office with an open floor plan. No walls. Shared desk space. Glass conference rooms. I quit after 11 months. It was the most stressful place I've ever worked.

Here’s why I work in an office: when I’m around other people — it doesn’t matter who they are — I feel a constant low-simmering level of anxiety. And I find it extremely difficult to be productive when I feel any level of anxiety at all.
— Source: inessential: Open Floor Plans

Montgomery Township, New Jersey, United States of America

Author: Khürt Williams

I work in application security architecture and I live in Montgomery Township, New Jersey with my wife Bhavna. Passionate about photography, you’ll find me writing about cybersecurity, tropical aquariums, terrariums, hiking, craft breweries, and capturing birds on camera. My prose is like a caffeinated squirrel—fast, unpredictable, and occasionally insightful.