34 Year Old Kodak T-MAX Negatives

I was bored. There was nothing on Netflix or Amazon Prime, Apple TV or Hulu, or HBO Max that I wanted to watch. To distract my mind from boredom, I rummage through a set of negatives from my early college days with 35mm film photography.

In college, the chemistry for developing a 35mm colour film was expensive. As a student on a limited budget, black-and-white photography was an attractive option. I had access to the darkroom at the Media Centre at Drew University, spending hours experimenting and developing Kodak Tri-X Pan, Ilford HP5 and Kodak T-Max.

Kodak T-MAX Professional is a black-and-white film known for its high resolution, sharpness, and fine grain for decades. It has a nominal sensitivity of ISO 100 or 400, making it a versatile choice for various lighting conditions.

One of the key features of T-MAX Professional is its T-Grain emulsion technology, which produces extremely fine grain and smooth tonal gradations. This makes it a popular choice among photographers who want to achieve a high level of detail and sharpness in their images.

T-MAX Professional also has a wide exposure latitude, allowing for greater flexibility in various lighting conditions. It can be pushed to higher ISOs without sacrificing image quality, making it a useful tool for low-light situations or for creating dramatic effects.

In addition to its technical features, T-MAX Professional is known for its classic black-and-white look, with deep blacks and bright whites that create a striking contrast. It has been popular among fine art photographers and documentary, portrait, and landscape photography.

November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400
November 1988 | Pentax P3 | SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/2 | Kodak T-MAX Professional   ISO 400

Author:Khürt Williams

A human who works in information security and enjoys photography, Formula 1 and craft ale.

2 thoughts on “34 Year Old Kodak T-MAX Negatives”

  1. I often feel nostalgic for the 1980s; it was a time before the proliferation of social media and the internet. Life was certainly different back then. People didn't have the constant distraction of their phones, and there was a greater emphasis on spending time together in person. I feel as if it were easier to connect with others in a meaningful way, without the distractions of constant notifications and digital noise. People had more time to engage in hobbies, explore their interests, or simply spend time in the company of friends and family.

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