Getting the iPad to Pro by Craig Mod (Craig Mod)

I’ve used iPads for eight years. Ever since the incredibly clunky — but oddly enthralling — version one.1 Mostly, it’s been confusing. Just what the heck are these things for? They’re definitely excellent for hypnotizing small children at restaurants. But since 2017, with the release of iOS 11 and basic multitasking, you could maybe — just maybe — earnestly use them as potential laptop replacements.

These new iPads may be gorgeous pieces of kit, but the iPad Pros of 2017 were also beautiful machines — svelte and overpowered. In fact, the iPad Pro hardware, engineering, and silicon teams are probably the most impressive units at Apple of recent years. The problem is, almost none of the usability or productivity issues with iPads are hardware issues.

Which is to say: For years now, the iPad’s shortcomings are all in iOS.

On a gut level, today’s iPad hardware feels about two or three years ahead of its software. Which is unfortunate, but not unfixable.

I was particularly interested in Craig’s experience as a photographer using the iPad Pro. My experiences and frustrations have been similar to Craig’s. Craig goes on to document his experiences trying to complete certain tasks (editing a spreadsheet, multiple documents etc.) on the iPad Pro. Please read it.

On Blogs in the Social Media Age - Study Hacks - Cal Newport by Cal Newport (Cal Newport)
A key dynamic driving the popularity of platforms like Facebook and Instagram, for example, is the following notion: if you like me, I’ll like you. As I noted in Deep Work, if you took the contents of the standard Facebook or Instagram feed and published it on a blog, it wouldn’t attract any readers, or comments, or links. But put this content on a Facebook wall and there’s an implicit social contract in place to motivate the people you know to click a like button, or leave a nice comment in the anticipation that you’ll do the same.