Island in the Net

A personal blog by Khürt Williams, full of inchoate writing on photography, coffee, and geekery.

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Category: Tutorials (page 1 of 62)

technology related posts tutorials

Sourland Mountain Gin and Blueberry Basil Fizz

  • Aperture—ƒ/4
  • Camera—NIKON D5100
  • Taken—15 July, 2017
  • Copyright—© 2017 Khürt L. Williams
  • Focal length—24mm
  • ISO—200
  • Shutter speed—1/160s

I like Sourland Mountain Spirits. I took a tour of the distillery shortly after opened to the public and I was impressed by the distillers expertise and attention to quality. I uploaded photos from the even back in March but never got around to writing a blog post about it. With this post, I have repurposed those photos.

I love blueberries. I like eating them a handful at a time. For me, it’s the best low-glycemic index snack. My daughter loves them too. She eats them by the carton. I recently learned that the blueberry is New Jersey’s state fruit. I thought that was cranberries. Scratched head. I’m sure I can find a recipe for gin and cranberry juice.

Sourland Mountain Gin and Blueberry Basil Fizz, Sourland Mountain Spirits NIKON D5100 20170311 9435 Edit 2

  • Aperture—ƒ/5.6
  • Camera—NIKON D5100
  • Taken—11 March, 2017
  • Copyright—© 2017 Khürt L. Williams
  • Focal length—55mm
  • ISO—1600
  • Location—40° 23.7095′ 0″ N 74° 44.777′ 0″ W
  • Shutter speed—1/250s

Sourland Mountain Spirits recently posted a recipe for a Blueberry Basil Gin Fizz on Facebook and I wanted to try it. I bought fresh blueberries from Von Thun Farms at the Montgomery Friends of Open Space Farmer’s Market on Saturday morning and used fresh basil from my garden planter. I bought two cartons of blueberries. One for me and one for my daughter.

Blueberry Basil Gin Fizz
* 10 blueberries from Von Thun Farms
* 2 basil leaves from my garden
* 2 ½ oz Sourland Mountain Spirits Gin purchased at Brick Farm Tavern
* ½ oz lime juice
* ½ oz simple syrup
* club soda

Sourland Mountain Gin and Blueberry Basil Fizz, Sourland Mountain Spirits NIKON D5100 20170311 9426

  • Aperture—ƒ/5.6
  • Camera—NIKON D5100
  • Taken—11 March, 2017
  • Copyright—© 2017 Khürt L. Williams
  • Focal length—34mm
  • ISO—4000
  • Location—40° 23.7095′ 0″ N 74° 44.777′ 0″ W
  • Shutter speed—1/250s

I combined the fish lime juice, simple syrup, blueberries and basil in a shaker and muddle the ingredients. That’s a fancy cocktail word for “mix up.” I think doing the muddling in a shallow bowl might be easier than doing it in the shaker. I think I’ll try that next time. After you’ve given your wrist some exercise, add the gin and ice to the shaker. Shake, shake, shake senora1 and strain into a glass with ice. Top with club soda. Garnish with a basil leaf or not. Sip. Relax. Enjoy.


  1. I couldn’t help myself but I think Harry Belafonte prefers rum. 

Fixing macOS share menu

This morning a few of the share menu itmes were missing from Safari on macOS Sierra. Looking in the Settings app I noticed that the menu item had been disabled. Clicking the enable check did nothing. I was not able to enable the share menu item for Facebook, Twitter, etc. I found this link with the following command that repaired the issue.

/System/Library/Frameworks/CoreServices.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/LaunchServices.framework/Versions/A/Support/lsregister -kill -seed

The Orton Effect

I recently learned about a landscape photography technique called the “Orton Effect”. The Orton Effect is a post-processing technique has been around for about thirty years that has become a trend. The technique is used to add a subtle (and sometimes not too subtle) glow to photographs. The technique creates an image that is simultaneously sharp and out-of-focus. The resulting image can be difficult to analyze or describe.

The Orton Effect is the creation of abstract landscape photographer Michael Orton who used it extensively in his film photography. The effect can be quite easy to reproduce with a DSLR and Adobe Photoshop. Here’s how.

The Orton Effect, Dirck Gulick House NIKON D5100 20170305 9296 7 8 Photomatix

Original Image

  • Aperture—ƒ/11
  • Camera—NIKON D5100
  • Copyright—© 2017 Khürt L. Williams
  • Focal length—16mm
  • ISO—100
  • Location—40° 26.9003′ 0″ N 74° 41.3978′ 0″ W
  • Shutter speed—1/125s

The Orton Effect, Screen Shot 2017 04 11 at 7.30.57 AM

Open your image in Photoshop and duplicate the layer:

The Orton Effect, Screen Shot 2017 04 11 at 7.33.55 AM

Select the top layer, and from the Photoshop menu, click Image and then Apply Image.

The Orton Effect, Screen Shot 2017 04 11 at 7.34.10 AM

For the “Apply Image” blending mode, click “Screen” and then hit enter.

The Orton Effect, Screen Shot 2017 04 11 at 7.34.41 AM

Duplicate this new layer, then click the “Multiply” blending mode. In the Photoshop menu, click Filter, then Blur, then Gaussian Blur.

The Orton Effect, Screen Shot 2017 04 11 at 7.34.55 AM

Adjust the blur radius to suit your taste.

The Orton Effect, Screen Shot 2017 04 11 at 7.38.19 AM

Merge the two top layers (Command+e on macOS or Control+e in Windows) and create a mask to decrease or increase the Orton Effect in different portions of the image.

The Orton Effect darkens the shadows of a photo. You may want to adjust the exposure or shadow slider in Lightroom. The result of applying a heavy Orton effect to the original image.

The Orton Effect, Dirck Gulick House NIKON D5100 20170305 9296 7 8 Photomatix Edit

Exaggerated Orton effect.

  • Aperture—ƒ/11
  • Camera—NIKON D5100
  • Copyright—© 2017 Khürt L. Williams
  • Focal length—16mm
  • ISO—100
  • Location—40° 26.9003′ 0″ N 74° 41.3978′ 0″ W
  • Shutter speed—1/125s