Kodak Portra 160 Color Film | Minolta X-700 | MD Rokkor-X 50mm F:1.7

Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160

NOTE: I’ll begin this experience report with a brief disclaimer. It’s been less than two years since I’ve returned to shooting 35mm film after switching to digital photography over 20 years ago. I’ve inundated myself in as much film education as I could find between web articles and advice from experienced film shooters. But, with my former experience way in the past and limited recent experience, this review is coming from a relative novice point of view.

These images are from a 36 exposure 35mm roll of Kodak Professional Portra 160 Color Negative Film that I shot on a recent beach trip. The first roll captured on my Minolta X-700 and MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 was Kodak Professional Ektachrome E100 35mm Color Transparency Film. I prefer the look of the image shot on Kodak Portra 160.

While shooting this roll, one of my concerns was whether I had set the ISO correctly on the camera. The Minolta X-700 film-speed ring has marks between numbered ISO graduations, but no numbers are printed at the markings for ISO 125 and ISO 160. I didn't bring my reading glasses with me, and while Bhavna tried to help, her eyes were not much better. I hoped I set the ISO correctly. I was also very nervous about loading the film, which I kept in my bag and under my seat until needed, in the bright sun.

I might have used the programmed auto-exposure (AE) mode - the "P" setting - for a few shots. With the camera set at " P " and the MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 lens at its minimum aperture of f/16, the X-700's program selected the aperture and fastest practicable shutter speed giving audible beeps to warn against motion blur. I discovered that if the lens is not set at the minimum aperture, the "P" will blink as a warning. This bit of information is essential. According to the manual, "although exposure will still be correct unless an over or under-range LED blinks, the program's range will be limited so that it cannot accommodate brighter subjects." I was at the beach on a bright sunny day. I didn't have room for error.

While the X-700's P mode is ideal for general picture-taking when all you want to do is compose, focus, and shoot, I felt comfortable using the aperture-priority auto-exposure (AE) mode. Many of the images were captured in aperture-priority AE mode with the lens set at f/8 most of the time. The Minolta X-700 automatically sets the step-less shutter speed.

It's interesting that when posting scans of film, I am always writing about events that happened weeks in the past. The turnaround time for 35mm film developing and scanning from the Darkroom is about two weeks, which is considered quick. I know that the quality and ease of use of 35mm film1 can't match that of my Fuji X-T2. I admit to enjoying the overall process.

Name Kodak Portra 160 Color Film
Type Colour (negative)
Native ISO 160
Format 35mm
Process C-41
Lab The Darkroom
Scanner The Darkroom
Software The Darkroom
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160
26 August, 2020 | Minolta X-700 | Minolta MD Rokkor-X 50mm f/1.7 | Kodak Portra 160

  1. For a film to match or exceed the quality of modern 35mm format digital cameras, you need to shoot medium to large format film. 

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