This morning a few of the share menu itmes were missing from Safari on macOS Sierra. Looking in the Settings app I noticed that the menu item had been disabled. Clicking the enable check did nothing. I was not able to enable the share menu item for Facebook, Twitter, etc. I found this link with the following command that repaired the issue.

/System/Library/Frameworks/CoreServices.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/LaunchServices.framework/Versions/A/Support/lsregister -kill -seed

Dirck Gulick House, House, Field

I recently learned about a landscape photography technique called the “Orton Effect”. The Orton Effect is a post-processing technique has been around for about thirty years that has become a trend. The technique is used to add a subtle (and sometimes not too subtle) glow to photographs. The technique creates an image that is simultaneously sharp and out-of-focus. The resulting image can be difficult to analyze or describe.

The Orton Effect is the creation of abstract landscape photographer Michael Orton who used it extensively in his film photography. The effect can be quite easy to reproduce with a DSLR and Adobe Photoshop. Here’s how.

Dirck Gulick House, House, Field
Original Image

screenshot, photoshop, Orton effect
Open your image in Photoshop and duplicate the layer:
screenshot, photoshop, Orton effect
Select the top layer, and from the Photoshop menu, click Image and then Apply Image.
screenshot, photoshop, Orton effect
For the “Apply Image” blending mode, click “Screen” and then hit enter.
screenshot, photoshop, Orton effect
Duplicate this new layer, then click the “Multiply” blending mode. In the Photoshop menu, click Filter, then Blur, then Gaussian Blur.
screenshot, photoshop, Orton effect
Adjust the blur radius to suit your taste.
screenshot, photoshop, Orton effect
Merge the two top layers (Command+e on macOS or Control+e in Windows) and create a mask to decrease or increase the Orton Effect in different portions of the image.

The Orton Effect darkens the shadows of a photo. You may want to adjust the exposure or shadow slider in Lightroom. The result of applying a heavy Orton effect to the original image.

Dirck Gulick House, House, Field
Exaggerated Orton effect.

Erin Brooks takes some wonderful shots with her iPhone 7+.

Sometimes, I think people believe PM is magical and will immediately produce a better image. Be cautious of relying on gear, no matter which camera you shoot with. Utilize the effect only when it will add value to your image. If the background is completely plain, like flat against a plain wall background, or a baby laying on a blanket being shot from above, it may not be necessary to use PM at all, and could also cause unwanted grain. If the background contributes to the story, blurring it too much would take away from the image. If the lighting is dark, and you really want a clear shot, I wouldn’t use it, and would instead take advantage of the regular photo mode’s improved low light abilities. The best part is, the screen gives you a live-view of your shot, so if you’re unsure whether PM is beneficial to your shot, toggle back and forth and see, before you press the shutter button.Erin Brooks