Getting the bundle identifier of an OS X application in a shell script (Super User)

How about reading the bundle identifier from the application's Info.plist file directly using PlistBuddy (8):

/usr/libexec/PlistBuddy -c 'Print CFBundleIdentifier' /Applications/Safari.app/Contents/Info.plist

I needed to obtain the bundle identifier to setup QuickCursor. This did the trick.

Getting the iPad to Pro by Craig Mod (Craig Mod)

I’ve used iPads for eight years. Ever since the incredibly clunky — but oddly enthralling — version one.1 Mostly, it’s been confusing. Just what the heck are these things for? They’re definitely excellent for hypnotizing small children at restaurants. But since 2017, with the release of iOS 11 and basic multitasking, you could maybe — just maybe — earnestly use them as potential laptop replacements.

These new iPads may be gorgeous pieces of kit, but the iPad Pros of 2017 were also beautiful machines — svelte and overpowered. In fact, the iPad Pro hardware, engineering, and silicon teams are probably the most impressive units at Apple of recent years. The problem is, almost none of the usability or productivity issues with iPads are hardware issues.

Which is to say: For years now, the iPad’s shortcomings are all in iOS.

On a gut level, today’s iPad hardware feels about two or three years ahead of its software. Which is unfortunate, but not unfixable.

I was particularly interested in Craig’s experience as a photographer using the iPad Pro. My experiences and frustrations have been similar to Craig’s. Craig goes on to document his experiences trying to complete certain tasks (editing a spreadsheet, multiple documents etc.) on the iPad Pro. Please read it.

Study: ‘Breakthrough’ Drug Reduces Graves’ Eye Disease Symptoms by Shantell M. Kirkendoll (University of Michigan Health)
Previous findings in Smith’s laboratory suggest that an insulinlike growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays an important role in Graves’ disease and other autoimmune diseases.

...

Study investigators examined the benefit of teprotumumab, a monoclonal antibody shown to inhibit IGF-1 function. It was originally developed as a cancer drug.

Although teprotumumab failed to exhibit efficacy in patients with cancer, the team thought it might be useful in interrupting the TED disease process.

At the end of the trial, 69 percent of study patients receiving infusions of teprotumumab once every three weeks had reduced eye bulging (proptosis), improved vision and increased quality of life compared with 20 percent in the placebo group.

...

Many participants showed improvement within six weeks when, according to the study, a reported 43 percent of patients in the treatment group had a response, compared with 4 percent in the placebo group.

Now that I have fully recovered from my thyroidectomy, I plan on seeing an eye specialist to seek help with my Graves Eye Disease.